Elizabeth Cady Stanton: A Radical For Women's Rights

Good Essays
Lois W. Banner, the author of Elizabeth Cady Stanton: A Radical for Women’s Rights and ten other books including “Intertwined Lives: Margaret Mead, Ruth Benedict, and Their Circle” which received Israel Fishman Non-fiction award from Stonewall Book Awards and Lambda Literary Award for Biography. She wrote a biography of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, a social activist, American suffragist, feminist, abolitionist, and one of the leading figure of the early women’s right movement. Elizabeth was born on November 12, 1815, in Johnstown, New York, and she became an expressive writer. She wrote the Declaration of Sentiments which was a revolutionary call for women’s rights. Her words and actions inspired other women to fight for their self-sovereign birthright …show more content…
She used her as a symbol of empowerment and equality. Gender equality was a great issue in the past where women cannot freely do everything they pleases. They are inferior to men, physically, socially, and politically. The idea was men and women are both human beings and the only difference was the gender, but the freedom and rights are different. Banner pointed out that even when Elizabeth adopted the argument that human history had originated in peaceful, democratic, matriarchal societies which were destroyed by aggressive, dictatorial, patriarchal ones, she contended that the final goal of history would not be a return to the rule of women but rather to the “amphiarchate,” the combined rule of men and women (78). She also explained that the inferiority of women was very common because in the United States, women were more emotional, less intelligent, or more prone to illness than men because society had made them so by denying them an education, a profession, exercise, and sensible clothing …show more content…
Banner mentioned that Elizabeth once put her strength to the test when she was pregnant with her fifth child, Margaret, and decided to challenge the standard belief that childbirth was the supreme example of woman’s weak physiology by proving it was a natural experience. She regularly exercised, and she took a three mile walk the night before the birth. With only a housekeeper and a nurse present, she delivered the baby herself and resumed her normal routine immediately (51). She wanted to prove to other people what women are capable of, and inspire other women to face their weaknesses. Although she was the only parent available for her seven children, she opened her house to the public so she can still conduct meetings. But Elizabeth took a bold action “despite the fact that she had small children at home, including baby, Cady Stanton went on the tour…. It was her final act of personal rebellion against her Seneca Falls situation, against her Johnstown family, and against her husband. Publicly, she had declared herself a Garrisonian” (Banner 68). She provoked and faced a hostile crowd which, in my opinion, caused their family in danger. Her dedication to revolutionize was dauntless where she was willing to risk her life, and potentially her family, to danger in exchange for freedom of speech and gender equality.

Overall, the book has a powerful message and

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    What truly is a myth was how society structured identities into people. Oakley wants readers to understand that inequality between genders was to not be taken as a silly matter; she believed that women should have been given equal titles just like men had. Women are not far superior to men as neither are men superior that women Oakley desires for women to not take advantage or be taken advantage of. All Betty and Jane wanted was to be equally viewed by their husbands, not to be confined or suppressed. Moreover, Oakley emphasizes that women would no longer stay in place as society or males wanted them to be.…

    • 1416 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Furthermore, the idea of a sisterhood became stronger when intersectionality became a topic of discussion. I always explain that anyone can be a feminist, male or female. Feminism is the goal to end all oppression and sexism. The reason why people believe feminism is anti-men is because of the failure to acknowledge that oppression and sexism benefit men more than women in our patriarchal…

    • 950 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    As each day passed, my mother acted as if her sister didn’t work there. On Tuesday morning my mother walked into that same building and noticed people were staring at her. All she could think of in that moment was that they knew who her sister was and the affair that her husband had with her. All my mother wanted to do was run out of that building as fast as she could, drive off and never come back. After my mother’s co-workers knew that my father had an affair with her sister, my aunt made my mother’s job a nightmare.…

    • 1162 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    “The subjection of women to men being a universal custom, any departure from it quite naturally appears unnatural” (1106). In opposition to the subjection of women being natural, Mill’s views it as simply being customary. It is a convention so ingrained within society, that people no longer question its legitimacy. Mill’s point of view drastically transforms the image of the inferior Victorian woman and motions to the possibility of total equality. This concept challenged the rigid beliefs of the Victorian Age and revealed the pressing issue of inequality between…

    • 1343 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Feminism Pros And Cons

    • 771 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Feminism is NOT Anti-Male: The literal definition of feminism is equality of the sexes. Thus, for feminists to be anti-male, they technically wouldn't even be feminists. We don't believe we're better than men or that we deserve more rights than men. We want to be treated the same way. Being in the third wave of feminism, women have already gained basic rights through the movement of the first and second waves.…

    • 771 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    He begins his argument by explaining that the subordination of women holds back society and ultimately no sex should have more power or benefits over the other sex (Mill 196). Mill’s first critique of the subjection of women is there was no trial to see if a patriarchal society works better than a society where both sexes are equal. He explains there should have been an experiment where women ruled men, men ruled women and both sexes were equal to have scientific evidence that society would be improved if men were always in power. Mill continues that the original idea of women being subordinate to men comes from theory and so it should only make sense to first test the theory before accepting it (197). He states “...or if there had been a society of men and women in which the women were not under the control of men, something might have been...known about the mental and moral differences...in the nature of each”, explaining that until we see women and men on an equal platform we cannot simply assume women are naturally unequal to men ( Mill 203).…

    • 1435 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Steinem thought that the reason women didn’t have equal laws was due to same sex-based myths. She says that “The truth is that all our problems stem from the same sex-based myths” (Steinem, 142). She believes that the laws are based upon men thinking women weren’t as capable at doing physical and mental work that men alone could accomplish. Steinem goes on to explain one of the examples reflected in the law and that is, “That women are biologically inferior to men” (Steinem, 142). Steinem argues that this was the main belief when laws were written.…

    • 927 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Simone believed that condemns women to the role of social and intellectual subordinate to males. Basically, stating that being feminine would make women a second sex in society. She also reassessed the biological, psychological and political reasons for a woman’s dependency. She concluded that while men define women as “the other”; it is women themselves who complacently accept their subordinate position. She states the “ [Women] have gained only what men have been willing to grant; they have taken nothing, they have only received” (SECONDSEX).…

    • 1169 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Feminism and women’s rights encompass many different aspects of society, but at the core they advocate the equal treatment of men and women. Women have been viewed as less significant and less influential than men throughout history, based upon the gender roles in which society imposes. Bernard Shaw uses the preface of Saint Joan to challenge the confining gender roles imposed upon women, by conveying how Joan is treated in her own time, the portrayal of her in literature and the importance of her physical appearance to historians. In supporting women’s role in society, Shaw refutes the gender roles that governed female behavior during Joan’s life. Shaw conveys how significance the gender roles faced by Joan were in her lifetime; the two…

    • 841 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Oppression Of Manhood

    • 1753 Words
    • 8 Pages

    In her famous work A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Mary Wollstonecraft wrote about the oppression women in society face, and the ways in which they are denied an equal chance to participate in society and make the best choices for themselves. Many of Wollstonecraft’s arguments are connected not only with women, but with the conceptions of manhood prevalent at the time. Through revealing social norms and double standards towards women in society and references to other prominent writers of the age, Wollstonecraft shows that, while manhood was equated with freedom, reason, intelligence and superiority, the conception of manhood lacked responsibility and accountability. The pressure of remaining virtuous was placed solely on women, Wollstonecraft…

    • 1753 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays