Edgar Allan Poe Literary Devices Analysis

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Literary devices are vital in the success of any piece literature. Authors use literary devices to create a better understanding for the audience by explaining often misunderstood concepts. When analyzing, intricate concepts are broken down into simpler terms then reorganized in a way that is easily understood. A commonly used device, known as repetition, encourages readers to re-evaluate their previous thoughts and feelings about certain events or characteristics, and how important they truly are. Published in 1844 a well-known poem, tells the details of a narrator’s perspective of the places he visits in his dream. The poem uses repetitive diction to guide the reader into changing their viewpoint on certain characteristics aforementioned. The author does this to guarantee the reader fully grasps the importance of concepts and why they are being repeated. Therefore, the reader recognizes what is being repeated and is led to reconsider the way they view the poem. Fundamentally, authors primarily use repetitive diction in their literature to lead the audience to reconsider their previous thoughts and the significance they hold in the poem as a whole.
In various forms of art, life is reflected. In almost all of his writing, Edgar Allan Poe includes numerous
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Repetition is significant to pieces of literature by emphasizing the material, creating a certain tone, modifying the mood, and allowing others to see into the visualities of the author and how he/she feels about the story. Using repetition in literary works not only benefits the author, but the readers as well. Readers appreciate the simplicity repetition adds to the story without having to read and comprehend various different words, which can be read in different perspectives if not written in a certain manner that readers

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