Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz's Optimism

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The German philosopher, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz was one of the greatest thinkers of the seventeenth and eighteenth century. He was known as the last "universal genius," who made insightful and important contributions to the fields of metaphysics, epistemology, logic, philosophy of religion, as well as mathematics, physics, geology, and history. One of the significant renaissance men of western thoughts. As an inventive and noble philosopher, Leibniz is appointed with developing the philosophical reasoning of optimism.

It is permissible to speak of Leibniz's optimism. Leibniz proclaims that what God has made is "of the highest perfection," this proclamation is referred to as Leibniz's optimism. Optimism, signifying the idea that the world
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Leibniz describes a world that is steeped in uniformity when evil loses positivity. Leibniz says that evil is acceptable because it was a part of Gods plan. Even if we humans do not understand we must see it as perfect. Anything that's happened in God's plan is for the common good of all possible worlds. God must be a powerful and all-knowing but also good. Despite that the world is filled with problems and evil things, it is still the best possible world. One can go either way, saying God is either not all-powerful and or all-knowing or infinite goodness, however, if either one is removed then God is being limited, hence saying that God isn't God, therefore, saying that there is no God. There is a God who chose the world with an enormous possible collection of phenomena gathered by the simplest possible laws, a world of balanced order. Leibniz tackles the problem of evil not by disregarding the blemishes of this world. Leibniz assumes that he can see the big picture and realize the harmony in the world, harmony is related to order. God being perfect creates a wold that holds the most things that exist in harmony. In Leibniz view, the phenomenon of evil is what God allows rather than what God wills. For Leibniz God naturally will the greatest possible good. In terms of a will, God has free will and humans do not. Humans live life with the thought of having free will because it is the only way to do it. …show more content…
Leibniz's intellectual training was objectively in the tradition scholasticism and Renaissance humanism; his background, in the past, was of Aristotelianism, Platonism, and orthodox Christianity. Leibniz defined his theory along with the idea that the God who he believed to avoid all theology and philosophy was a kind God and would balance the world appropriately with both Good and evil, maximizing the condition of society. Leibniz advised that the evil in the world was the result of sin either from a physical or metaphysical level and was an outcome of free will. Leibniz's world includes only God and non-composite, immaterial, soul-like entities which are called "Monads." Leibniz describes "Monads" as an uncomplicated substance that cannot be divided into parts. A compound substance can be made by a gathering of monads. Henceforth, a compound of substance can be distributed into simple parts. Monads possess a non-material character and are utterly commonly independent, such that interactions among monads are only apparent. Leibniz argued that things tend to cause each other because God has ordained a pre-established harmony among everything in the

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