Krokodil: Opioid Derivatives Of Codeine

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After While Krokodil Krokodil is an opioid derivative of codeine. The drug was made to mirror the effects of a pharmaceutical drug, no longer in use, called desomorphine. Krokodile is a homemade version, that is much cheaper then heroin, and has horrible side effects due to the dangerous solvents used when cooking the drug. Krokodil is highly addictive, and is injected into the body. The sites of the injection will develop scale-like skin, and have infected ulcerations. There are very few reports of Krokodil in the United States, but is used widely in Russia, and other surrounding countries.
What is Krokodil Krokodil is a synthetic drug that deliver’s the same effect of heroin, and morphine. The medical name is desomorphine, and the homemade version is call
…show more content…
(Anderson, 2014)
People Most Likely to Use Krokodil People who use heroin, and are drawn to the effects the heroin has on the body. People who are addicts already and those who cannot financially afford the high cost of heroin, are prone to make or use the drug krokodil. The people in countries that sell codeine over the counter have a greater risk of turning to the drug krokodil. In other counties. The United States does not sell codeine over the counter, and had listed codeine a schedule II drug, and the only way to obtain it legally is to get a prescription. (Control, 2016) The age of most users of the krokodil drug is between the ages of 18 and 25 years of age.
Why Do People Use Krokodil The cost and availability of heroin is the only reason addicts turn to krokodil over the preference of heroin. The cost of a gram of heroin varies from country to country. In the United
States a gram sells for $110.00, in Japan a gram of heroin sells for $683.00. Germany has one of the lowest prices per gram at $48.00. These countries represent the highest to the lowest, heroin cost. (Havocscope , 2016) The average cost of krokodil is $3.40, this varies on

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