Konrad Zuse: The Pioneer Of Computer Engineering

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Konrad Zuse is commonly referred to as the Pioneer of computer engineering. Coming from humble begging’s, Zuse’s father worked at a post office to support his son’s interest in computers. Born in Berlin, Zuse attended school as an architect until switching to a civil engineering degree. Tedious calculations in his school work made Zuse want to develop a machine to help him. After taking a job in Herschel Aircraft Co., he began to work on the Z1, his first attempt at a mechanical computer. After 3 years of work, he produced the first computer to use binary number memory system, which used rod positions. However the Z1 was not efficient, thus leading the company to help produce the Z2 computer, which utilized two methods for memory storage. However, …show more content…
By the age of seventeen he was able to gain entrance to Berlin’s Charolttenburg Technical College, majoring in civil engineering. He was a gifted in artistry and technology, it was there he developed ideas for up the first universal computer. After leaving a job as a structural engineer, Zuse spent time making early versions of computing devices known as the Z1. With the help of his friends, the machine was built out of scrap metal and glass parts. At the start of the war in 1939 he built two successive versions, the Z2 and Z3. Following, he was drafted into the army as an infantryman for 6 months until German officers thought he would suit better developing flying bombs for the army. There, he improved his model the Z3 which was a computer built with electromagnetic relays, included binary numbering system as well as floating point numbers, and used punched film tape. After completion of the Z3 Zuse was again drafted to the army and excused to develop computers again. After his developments of computers, Zuse was inspired to start something new. He developed Plankalkul or plan calculus, which was one of the first algorithmic language. Designed for chess playing, the language utilized both numerical and non-numerical problems in a matrix. While it was difficult to read on several formats, it was something ahead of its time for software development.

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