A Comparison Of Kate Chopin's Literature

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Comparison of Kate Chopin’s Literature The 1800s served as a turning point for the role of women in society. Nearing the end of the century, the idea that women should not work outside the home began to be challenged, and women started to hold jobs of their own (Fischer et al., 2000). Great opportunity was given to unmarried women, as they gained independence in living apart from their families (Fischer et al., 2000). Women began to fight for their independence, opposing the idea of only being known as a housewife. Kate Chopin was among the individuals who challenged what the role of women in society was during the late 1800s. Chopin shares her perspective in her two short …show more content…
The storm depicts the passion between Alcée and Calitxta, which is both strong and powerful, but does not cause any damage (Larsson). The onset of the storm marks the beginning of their romantic affair. The storm brings dark clouds over the town, signifying the turmoil in Calixta’s marriage: “Sombre clouds…were rolling with sinister intention from the west, accompanied by a sullen, threatening roar” (Chopin, “The Storm”). As the storm grows stronger, the passion between Alcée and Calixta does as well. The two are blinded by the storm as their intimacy grows: “They did not heed the crashing torrents, and the roar of the elements made her laugh as she lay in his arms” (Chopin, “The Storm). Like the storm, Alcée and Calixta’s affection towards each other is natural; as a result, they are not troubled by moral consequence (Rosenblum, 2004a). For this reason, there is no damage caused by the storm. After the rain, it is described that, “The sun was turning the glistening green world into a palace of gems” (Chopin, “The Storm”). The color white also serves as a symbol in “The Storm.” The numerous references to the color white symbolize the purity of Calixta that Alcée had once desired when he was with her in Assumption. Calixta seemed …show more content…
The main theme illustrated in the story is the oppressiveness of marriage. Mrs. Mallard desires the freedom that she lost when she married Brently (Rosenblum, 2004b). Despite having a cordial relationship with her husband, the marriage is still oppressive for Mrs. Mallard. Marriage has left her trapped in her upstairs bedroom, looking out of her window while longing for escape. For this reason, she gains a sense of liberation upon hearing the news of her husband’s death (Evans). She is finally able to relish the days of her future: “There was a feverish triumph in her eyes, and she carried herself unwittingly like a goddess of Victory” (Chopin, “The Story”). The triumph in Mrs. Mallard’s eyes reveals her freedom from the oppressive marriage. Even though her freedom is short-lived, it serves as an example for the freedom that comes with independence. The delay in revealing Mrs. Mallard’s first name is another indication of the oppression that marriage brings. Mrs. Mallard’s first name, Louise, is not revealed until the news of her husband’s death is announced: “Louise, open the door! I beg; open the door-you will make yourself ill” (Chopin, “The Story”). This indicates that Mrs. Mallard only experiences independence as an unmarried woman. Furthermore, Mrs. Mallard’s bleak outlook on her life suggests that marriage is oppressive. For Mrs. Mallard, the thought of a long

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