Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto

Good Essays
Gabriel Soriano
Professor Jacob
PHI 2010
3 December 2017
Karl Marx’s Communist Manifesto Authoritarian regimes, restricted freedom of speech, international conflicts. These are some of the factors that are often associated with communism from a modern perspective. Appropriation (and alteration) of Karl Marx’s philosophy for personal gain and quests for power by different figures throughout history created confusion a deviation from Marx’s original Ideas, which were inspired by the analysis of class struggles over history, as well as a profound disagreement with capitalism’s ulterior motives. To understand Karl Marx’s ethics and epistemology, it is important to take into consideration his background, as well as the social environment of his
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Capitalism is a system driven by competition and changing supply and demand, based on private property. Marx’s description of Capitalism as the most efficient economic system is based on the growth of Capitalism during the 19th century in Europe due to the industrial revolution, as well as his views of the system as a whole. The mutual need between the bourgeois and proletariat based on the growing economic need of the working class and the growing ambitions and competition of the high class caused industry to grow at an exponential rate. Additionally, population growth during the time, leading to an increase in demand, added to the growth of capitalism. However, Marx describes Capitalism as the most pernicious of economic systems, because as it grows, and the bourgeois become wealthier, the proletariat increase in numbers, and become poorer. This interaction and what Marx considers to be its unfair qualities lead him to develop the Communist Manifesto. In the end, however, Marx believed that Capitalism created its own “grave diggers” as its growth also implied the growth of the number of people of the working class living under terrible conditions, as well as people who will eventually be inspired to want and seek change, causing Capitalism to be the cause of its own ending. In other words, the greed of the bourgeois leads to the growth of Capitalism and the growth of the proletariats, who …show more content…
Forces of production take into consideration anything that is necessary to produce the goods and services a society needs. This not only includes structures and raw materials, but also human labor as well. The form of production then refers to how these “forces” are then structured within a society to function and finally produce the necessary goods and services. Marx also discusses the role of technology in eventually replacing Capitalism. Technology, one of the main components of the industrial revolution which throve on Capitalism could actually bring Capitalism to its end (under Marx’s views) as it is always a contributor to change in society. Enough technological developments shifting society as a whole could eventually make the capitalist economic system obsolete, causing it to

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