Mr Kandinsky Essay

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The Life of Mr. Kandinsky

Wassily (or Vassily) Kandinsky was born to his mother Lidia Ticheeva and father Vasily Kandinsky on December 16, 1866 in Moscow, Russia and at the age of five him and his family moved to Odessa. Kandinsky was educated at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich, Germany. He is best known for his abstract paintings and was part of the expressionism and abstract art movement in his lifetime. Kandinsky did not, however, just create art. As a young boy, he learned to play the cello and piano, and also wrote poetry. In school, Wassily did not just study art; he also studied law and economics between 1886 and 1892 at the University of Moscow. After his end of studies in 1893, Wassily accepted a position on the law faculty of
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A large inciting factor of Wassily’s decision was his inspiration from the French artist, Claude Monet. Kandinsky liked that “in Monet’s paintings the subject matter played a secondary role to color.” This led to some of Kandinsky’s earlier works being a mixture of folk art and reality. One of his earlier works that presents the color over matter idea was Kandinsky’s painting, Munich-Schwabing with the Church of St. Ursula. As seen here to right, Wassily Kandinsky pays more attention to the contrast in bright colors than the family having a picnic or the church in the background. While he still paints in a manner that you still see the general shape, this is the extent of his detail at this point in his painting …show more content…
However in 1933, just 11 years later, the Nazis seized power shutting down the Bauhaus. Wassily then moved to an apartment in Paris, France where he created his works in a living-room studio. In 1937 “he and other artists were featured in the “Degenerate Art Exhibition” in Munich.” Many people came to the exhibition; however 57 of his works were taken by the Nazis.
While in France his idea of abstract altered slightly. Wassily moved more towards biomorphic abstract art rather than hard geometric shapes and would also sometime mix in sand with his paint to make his art feel more rustic and granular and creating new color schemes and compositions slightly reminiscent of Slavic popular art. An example of this more organic abstract art style is Wassliy’s work Composition X, painted in 1939, seen to the left.
Another example of Kandinsky’s biomorphic phase was his painting Composition VII painted in 1913 and seen to the

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