Analysis Of Joseph Stalin's Industrialization

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Joseph Stalin’s Industrialization of the Country, 1928, represents his all-encompassing sweeping push to reform The Soviet Union into a country that would have the technological and industrial capabilities to play a large role in the international affairs of the world. As it occurred through some periods of Russia’s history, starting with Peter the Great’s push for urbanization, Stalin desired to transform the USSR from a “backwater” nation into a force that could be on-par with some of the most powerful nations of that age. The document, an excerpt from a larger collection of his works, demonstrates the total power of Stalin and the State that is being used to mold the country into a powerful force, despite the loss and toll on human life …show more content…
In order to catch up, match, or even surpass other capitalist nations, as Stalin strongly desires, every person in the country must submit to the central government. Using the comparison, “like an island in the midst of the sea,” implies Russia’s troubled and rocky position as it moves forward. In order to keep from sinking, the main point of this document is that the State, and more specifically, Stalin, must lead Russia with absolute control over every aspect of production. It is not only desired, but necessary, to quickly industrialize the country. He argued that the Soviet Union has the most “advanced system,” being the strongest nation ideologically and politically, and must have an advanced technological system to match it. Otherwise, they will ultimately fall behind and collapse. The worst outcome, according to Stalin, would be a return to capitalism if this demand for large-scale agriculture and production is not …show more content…
Contradicting Stalin’s words, and the fundamental message of communism, the common people and workers ended up with much of the burdens and sacrifices. While this document proved that Stalin was fully committed to transforming Russia into a vital economic and industrial country, he did so at the expense of his people. The proletariat were the ones to suffer underneath these policies; if they were unskilled, if they could not keep up with the quotas or demands, and they paid the price for such a rapid movement. Terror ended up being a key motive to push these practices along, which was very prevalent once Stalin became more paranoid over the years. Villages were accused of hiding the grain and other items of production. Created famines devastated much of the western Soviet Union, especially Ukraine. In his goal to move Russia forward, he betrayed the popular and perceived ideals of communism in a complete inhumane and hypocritical way. The massive human rights violations committed by Stalin’s regime, and how this industrialization initially had very low-turn outs of production, was an obvious contrast to how he framed it in his work. The collectivization of the USSR had great costs to the seemingly glorified process of enacting it, and Stalin was very crafty in his written work to avoid mentioning the costs. Instead, even in

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