John Ruskin The Seven Lamps Of Architecture Analysis

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The ninetieth century, or the machine age, became a time period in America in which the demands for goods were heightened due to the fast pace producibility the machine was capable of. No longer bound by human limitation, the machines allowed for a hyper manufacturing of products in a quicker and inexpensive manner. However, not all backed for the machine age and argued that the machine had taken away the quality of product. Philosopher John Ruskin wrote in The Seven Lamps of Architecture, about machines destroying creativity, and he was an advocate of medieval architecture due to it’s honesty in craftsmanship and preservation of material which he felt industrialization had eliminated (Kemp 1992). He also voiced social criticism regarding …show more content…
from the very start until the very end. Furthermore, the craftsmanship of pieces or furniture would be designed in such a way in which screws and nails were not needed, and he believed that the durability of furniture depended on joinery. Color within the style was mostly muted, were the touches of color were given through details like rugs, stain glass, or one vivid color within a block of space, or wall paper with a specific motif. The structure within the architecture arts and craft style also embodied honesty shown by exposed beams found in the ceiling, following the breaking down the wall in sections as portrayed in photo 1.2. Large pane windows, and glass with stained and art glass were commonly found within examples of the style. The Gamble House’s entrance door is one of the best examples of the usage of stained art glass within architecture, and the best case studies for the Arts and Craft movement are residential homes, as the style’s motive was to enhance the quality of life by enhancing it’s aesthetic value, which was mostly found in the making of furniture and every day objects to enrich a living space (Blakesley …show more content…
The school was ran by Calvin Milton Woodward, who was an engineer and advocate of hands on training. The curriculum of the school was influential to the Greene brother’s interest in the Arts and Craft Movement, as the ideals of craftsmanship had been already part of their training in their prior education by working with metal and woodworking. The brothers went on to pursue a two year certificate program at MIT’s School of Architecture, were their focus was on studying different building styles (Makinson 1977). The two brothers moved back to Pasadena California after working in different firms located in Boston. The Greene’s Japanese influence in later work is said to stem from seeing examples of Japanese architecture in their pit stop at the World’s Columbian Exposition while they were on their way back to Pasadena (Makinson

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