Jfk Response

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JFK’s Responses and their Consequences The two aforementioned men set up this crisis. However, President John F. Kennedy had the world’s fate in his hands. Every decision that he made would be vital in the way that the crisis played out, and if he had made just a couple more mistakes, then a nuclear war might’ve started. But what the American citizens did not know at the time was that his decisions were based more off of his personal experiences rather than off the information from his advisory council. Both him and Khrushchev “almost blundered into a nuclear war through the crisis management approaches of their advisory systems, but then managed to extricate themselves using personal diplomacy”(Richard, 2001, p. 1). Now, despite the fact …show more content…
So he decided that the best way to ward off the United States and their future possible invasions was by accepting help from the Soviets. However, Kennedy did not respond to this in the way that Castro wanted. Kennedy’s next move was incredibly risky, but due to his new aggressive policy towards the Cubans and Russians, he decided to go through with it. By placing a blockade around Cuba, which denied Russia access to them, Kennedy isolated Castro and forced him to decide whether to attack or give in to Kennedy’s demands. This move was risky due to the fact that Castro could have just simply decided to launch the missiles that were already in his possession and do as much damage to the Americans as he possibly could. But thankfully, Kennedy’s strategy paid off. After only 13 days, both Castro and Khrushchev agreed to remove the Russian weapons from Cuban soil. Because of this move, Kennedy is credited with ending the Cuban Missile Crisis. He is praised by many because he avoided a nuclear war. But just because a war was avoided, it does not mean that he handled this crisis to the best of his ability. His various errors are what really escalated this situation and some of those, such as the Bay of Pigs invasion, nearly started a

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