Ismene Arguments In Antigone

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In defending the gods’ laws, Antigone states “I must please those below a longer time than people here” (Line 74). Reinforcing her argument, Antigone attempts to reason with Ismene to join her cause and help in the burial of her disgraced brother. Antigone explains that if she follows Creon, she will suffer longer lasting consequences with the gods than she would following him. Antigone seems to contrast the severity of the consequences by showing how Creon’s execution will only hurt now, yet help her in the afterlife. Despite her pleading, Ismene refuses to help stating “I have no strength for it” (77). As a result, Antigone suffers as she has no one left to support her. She is forced to leave Ismene behind to fight what she believes is right. …show more content…
Antigone responds “Don’t worry for me; straighten out your own life” demonstrating how she believes Ismene is making a mistake. As the two continue to converse about how they should handle the burial of their brother, Ismene makes her final argument saying that Antigone is simply starting an impossible quest. Antigone however responds that even if she fails and suffers, she will at least not suffer a shameful death. In the end, Ismene finally agrees to disagree stating she will always love her despite how foolishness she becomes (83-97). Through her arguments, Antigone shows how she believes that Ismene, not her, is making the crucial mistake. Throughout their conversation, Antigone realizes that although she has always had support behind her, she will have to complete the hardest quest of her life alone as her sister is stepping away. Through their royal status she has always had someone there for her, but no more. Despite her loneliness, Antigone sticks to her morals by following the gods instead of Creon as she argues the consequences are far more severe by taking the other …show more content…
For example, Antigone criticizes Creon stating “I would never think your pronouncements had such strength that, being mortal, they could override the unwritten, everlasting prescriptions of the gods” (463). Antigone shows that despite what Creon says, he is nothing but another man in the world of the gods. She argues that since he is nothing but another mortal in this world, his commands have no power over those of the immortal gods. In result, Antigone is able to expose how weak Creon really is, angering him even further. While Creon is suffering from his exposed weakness, Antigone is affected by her becoming more emotionally stable and strong as she stands up to a man in Greek society. Despite her increased strength, Antigone also knows that through her protest, she will also die. Unlike others though, Antigone accepts her fore coming faith stating “Anyone who lives a life of sorrow as I do, how could they not count it a blessing to die” (474). Alluding to Esther in the Bible, Antigone is able to convey that she lives a life of piety and caution, but contains the faith and courage to stand up for what is right. Through the tyrannical leadership of Creon, Antigone is affected brutally as she suffers from loneliness and sadness, but also becomes sturdier in her faith in addition to becoming more emotionally

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