Homeland Security Risk Management

1233 Words 5 Pages
Risk Management and Homeland Security Risk management is the systematic and analytical process of assessing the likelihood of a threat to compromise critical infrastructure (Decker, 2002) and other potential targets susceptible to any form of threats. In assessing risks, the formula R = f(C, V, T) is used, whereas the level of risk (R) is seen as a function of the consequences (C), vulnerability (V), and the likelihood of a threat (T). One may ask why a mathematical function that requires numerical, quantifiable values is used to measure a subjective national security concept. This is the question which this paper will attempt to answer—the use and importance of risk management in homeland security and its related activities and initiatives. …show more content…
Interestingly, in this area, post-event response is one of the considerations for the DHS in providing grants. There are certain grants, such as the Urban Areas Security Initiative (UASI) and Law Enforcement Terrorism Prevention Program (LETPP) which provide funds to local governments not only for protection against terrorism but also in recovery from such acts. Also, there are the Metropolitan Medical Response System (MMRS) and the Citizen Corps Program (CCP) which are designed for post-event response (Masse, O’Neil, and Rollins, 2007). Following this, resource allocation is not limited to the aggregate function of the risk level with all variables considered. Instead, the variables themselves—in this case, the consequence—as well as additional factors not included in the formula, such as effectiveness of the grant, play a role in determining not only the amount of resources a certain asset or infrastructure shall receive but also the kind and the purpose for which it should be …show more content…
By including the former two categories in the SNRA, it recognizes that threats to national security are not limited to those which are sponsored by both violent state and non-state actors, one that is noticeable in many literature where risk assessment and risk management are more often than not limited to analyzing and mitigating terrorism (as such one by Decker,

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