Colonial Puebla Analysis

Good Essays
Identity, Ritual, and Power in Colonial Puebla Public ritual shaped the political culture, as well as the lives of the residents and officials in Puebla. Frances L. Ramos’ Identity, Ritual, and Power in Colonial Puebla illustrates us the importance of these rituals and how they played an integral role in connecting abstract influences within residents and imperial identities. Ritual “helped to reaffirm hierarchy and strengthen people’s affiliations to local corporations, their city, the imperial body politic, and the spiritual body of Christ.” (Ramos, 212) Additionally, as mentioned in the latter quote, the city’s Cabildo (town council) applied ritual to promote a stronger sense of religiosity to the residents of Puebla. These two roles shared …show more content…
To be specific, ritual was used to celebrate both local officials and members of the crown. This ritual was an effective way to show the residents of Puebla how their leaders were influential, relevant and important to the community. The crown did not want to seem disconnected from the residents, albeit, there was always a sense of detachment from the king. Furthermore, Ramos illustrates the specific role of the crown as it shows the king as the head of the body politic. As per the book, the Spanish crown correlated to the ideals of a patriarchy and, as such, rituals effectively promoted these principles. In lieu of the crown, the Viceroy was reified through ritual as they held the highest power within New Spain and a direct link to the public in Puebla. Ceremonies were created to promote the king and its own local authority as head of Puebla 's political body. In association with the Viceroy and the Spanish crown, ritual concerning the Catholic church was not an uncommon practice in …show more content…
Religion played a major role in Colonial era Mexico. “Ritual, of course, did not just serve the state, but served the broader church and played a primary role in creating a religious culture particular to Puebla” (Ramos, 214). To promote religion, officials used ritual to create liturgical ceremonies/occasions such as Christmas celebrations and the Easter. Moreover, the Cabildo helped set up local patron saints, most which were “elected to protect the city from natural disasters” (Ramos, 214). Puebla’s rituals served to connect the crown and the viceroy to the people. To shed light into ritual in Puebla and the promotion of religion, by creating a civic liturgy and ceremonies, the Cabildo acted like a mediator and a central amalgamating force. It is to be held true that both local and imperial identities and the church utilized ritual within Puebla to accomplish the same

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    From the many subliminal messages the church inputted into society through the use of localized churches in the towns, the church was able to assimilate into society after gaining trust and access throughout different societies. One of these areas in society, influenced by the church, was their artistic depictions and artistic works throughout Europe. Commonly throughout the Middle Ages depictions of deities, such as Mary, the disciples, and Jesus are all found throughout most of the work done in the period of history. Other art pieces also depict the actions of the church or the beliefs that the Roman Catholic Church held. The continual need to paint different depictions in the churches was fueled by the large spread of the church and its followers (Sorabella).…

    • 1031 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    For example, many of the ideas about religion in the middle ages ushered in the Enlightenment and were part of its core values. The works of St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas on justice and dignity play a major role in the development of the concept of human rights with the focus on equality and justice in the Enlightenment period (Charlton and Barker 326). The final, and strongest, argument Charlton and Barker present is that religion has to be a part of public policy in a liberal democracy because a healthy democratic regime is only sustained through plurality of arguments and positions. This entails the involvement of religious arguments alongside other interest groups and social movements that make their arguments heard as constituents in hopes of affecting the policy making process to achieve the ideal society they wish to live in. This is also aided by the capability of churches and other religious institutions to mobilize their members based on the belief that “the church is one of the few institutions that the people — in a communal sense— own and control” (Stith 154).…

    • 1603 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Ethno-Catholism

    • 478 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Throughout the book, it informs readers about Etho-Catholism which is referred to a group of Mexican Americans that have a common religious background. First, Treviño explains in the beginning that the Spanish and Mexican Catholics created a etho-catholic idea for their everyday lives which helped the people during harsh times. Etho-Catholism contained practices by the Old World Spanish Christians and the…

    • 478 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Cardenas And Populism

    • 1736 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Cardenismo at is core is based on populist principles of appealing to the masses. To maintain order and popularity President Cardenas created policies that would make the masses content, regardless of their long-term implications. By disguising the policies with populist rhetoric Cardenas was able to appear to be institutionalizing the ideals of the Mexican Revolution. In reality he was cutting deals right and left in order to maintain his popularity. This political performance resulted in Cardenas appearing to be a reformer who created and passed reforms that would bring about radical change to Mexico.…

    • 1736 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Mythic Dimension

    • 1313 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The mythic aspect which describes the dimension of religion based on the values of folk stories and ancient myths by which religions form a certain path which is to be followed. Therefore the mythic values as stated in the provided texts are vital stories that enforce the beliefs that are used to establish religious morals, generally handed down from generation to generation. Hence it brings cultural value to the religious aspect as well. For these stories run in family line, whether it is widely known or small communal stories that are passed down. The narrative dimension is said to be closely related to the ritual dimensions as the two are generally seen to be side by side.…

    • 1313 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Later on Religion started to be an important motive for the age of exploration. The spreading of religion while exploring the new world were committed of many countries by the Catholic rulers. The English and the Dutch were also committed to spreading religion, and they would encourage Christianity on native Americans. The Spanish people were in fact to require with them on expeditions in order to convert others to Christianity. Not only the Europeans, Spanish, English, and Dutch people of the old world exploring to spread religion, but many were exploring to seek religion for freedom.…

    • 1959 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    John Paul II, states that the role of the Magisterium is to promote morality according to the church teachings passed down from God to the apostles and their eventual successors. This infallibility associated with the Magisterium assumes that their teachings on social controversies, such as euthanasia and abortion are authentic because God and the Church’s tradition because it adheres to earlier teachings passed down from the Church Fathers. Within Congar’s The Meaning of Tradition, Christ and the Holy Spirit play a big role in the creation of Church tradition. The Holy Spirit imbues the Magisterium with the inspiration to write scripture. Inspiration through the Holy Spirit is seen throughout the Old Testament with the prophets and within the writings of the New Testament.…

    • 958 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    New England Colonies Dbq

    • 1169 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Those documents contributed to the development of the colonies like Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay but there were also documents that helped develop colonies like Rhode Island. Roger Williams’ “A Plea for Religious Liberty,” he mentions how God did not require a uniformity, a sameness of religion to be enforced due to the fact that it will occasionally bring civil war (document F). Other than internal matters and beliefs, the colonist faced another issue that also involves persons with different belief than their own but this issue does help develop the colonies socially and economically. Many encounters with the Indians for land, soon led to war. Settlers who wanted to expand Connecticut, ended up fighting with the Indians in the Pequot War.…

    • 1169 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    It is argued that the Aztecs took a mechanistic approach because “Aztec ceremonies, were guided by detailed ritual calendars” (66, Carrasco). Franke J. Neumann author of The Experience of Time in Nahuatl Religion, explains that the Aztecs looked upon the calendar as a “central fact of their lives...it filled a very large place in the ceremonial life of people” (256, Neumann). On the other hand, the Mayan largely focused on the calculations that helped develop the calendar in order to predict future occurrences and the renewal of their…

    • 1073 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    For Jefferson, his cataloging of the political spheres that developed over time to favor religious freedom was an important cultural production of it’s own. Jefferson’s observations were a body of work that let people of the early Republic see a current point of view; a point of view in which the imagined communities of the early Republic came together as a whole. Although Jefferson’s notes were only a part of the work that he contributed to the founding of the country, the notes hold a great cultural and political significance since they helped explain and develop a portion of the ideology behind some of the Bill of Rights. Apess’ autobiography was also a form of cultural production; however, Apess also made direct contributions to the methodist church; he made contributions that not only addressed the marginalized peoples deprivation- but worked to change it. Apess knew that it was his right to believe whatever he felt inclined to believe.…

    • 1714 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays

Related Topics