Imperialism In How The Other Half Lives By Jacob Riis

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rapid industrialization, space became very limited. With little living space, “Landlords knew they could rent dwellings for a profit regardless of their conditions.” Immigrants and other poor laborers simply could not escape this poverty. They lived hard lives. At work, conditions were poor and wages were low. Many were crowded in overpriced and abysmal housing. In this sense, immigrants, migrants, and low wage earners paid the highest price for rapid industrialization.
The slums conjured up by rapid industrialization were eventually exposed. Jacob Riis, a Danish immigrant, photographed and wrote about the slums in New York City. In his book, How the Other Half Lives, Riis went on to discuss how the babies in the slums were affected. Riis
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Emilio Aguinaldo, a Filipino, was a strong opponent of US imperialism. Aguinaldo lead the fight for freedom in the Philippines against American imperialism. He used tactics of guerilla warfare to fight for independence. Aguinaldo emphasized the uncontrolled nationalism of the United States in his words. One can feel the anger when Aguinaldo pronounces, “[America] went to the Philippines under the impression that their inhabitants were ignorant…We have been represented by your popular press as if we were Africans or Mohawk Indians.” Many in the Philippines were enraged about extreme United States nationalism, and Aguinaldo gave them a …show more content…
The North American purported that “It is high time for us to realize justly our own status, and to see that in taking part in affairs of the world.” This grandiose reflected the ideological American pride of the time. Some of the hype would prove true, but “The American economy experienced a sever postwar recession. And much of the middle class…responded to demands for change with a fearful, conservative hostility.” Even though America won the war aboard, widespread fear ascertains the idea that America lost the war at home. Moreover, Americans experienced growing anxiety over the spread of the Communism. Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer proclaimed that, “first that the Reds” [are] criminal aliens, and secondly that the American Government must prevent crime.” Palmer helps support the notion that the war inspires fear and distrust in a society. He went on to ask, “what will become of the United States Government if these alien radicals are permitted to carry out principles of the Communist part [in America].” This element of red scar showed the apprehension about their neighbors many Americans

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