Social Issues In The 1920's

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1920s Americas history was a major catalyst in changing American culture. Straight out of World War 1, Americans brought light to many social issues that were left in the dust because of the focus on the war. F. Scott Fitzgerald, a novelist during the 1920s said on the era "The parties were bigger…the pace was faster…and the morals were looser." The “roaring twenties” played an important role in shaping social aspects of American society. Ideas like women’s rights, alcohol consumption, and black rights were some of the social issues this era dealt with. Prohibition was one of the major changes to American society implemented in the 20s. People had begun to worry about the role of alcohol in American society. It had become a symbol of celebration, …show more content…
Henry Rhodes in the essay “The Social Contributions of The Harlem Renaissance” states the movement can be “described as a period of vigorous artistic and intellectual activity on the part of the Negro intellectual”. This “renaissance” was the movement of blacks to Harlem, New York and surrounding areas. New York was vastly different from the rural life that most people had called home. This movement wanted to bring awareness to the white population of the abilities blacks had, specifically in the arts. By bringing something the white majority liked: art, music, and literature, the black population was able to help some whites learn that they were no better from them just because their skin was a darker shade. In addition this movement increased the amount of education children were receiving, which in turn increased the literacy rates among the black population. This movement also influenced new styles of art and music within the black population. Many influential black writers were involved in the Harlem Renaissance, influencing black writers to continue their trade for decades after this movement. Testing the racial boundaries that were placed on black Americans in the early 1900s was something that could only be accomplished during a time already experiencing great change. During this era, people became more open to changing cultural values based on new discoveries and

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