European Colonisation Of Australia Case Study

Better Essays
During the European colonisation of Australia, oppressive laws functioned to subjugate and control the indigenous population. The Aborigines Protection Act, 1909 (Cth) was particularly devastating, stripping Indigenous people of basic human rights and freedoms, and robbing generations of their connection to their families and culture. The Act was abolished in 1969, however, the trauma continues to impact the wellbeing of Indigenous people today. In an effort to reconcile past injustices and improve the lives of Indigenous people, the Federal Parliament established the Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation Act 1991 (CAR) (Cth) to manage the reconciliation process in Australia. This essay will examine the long-term impact of European colonisation …show more content…
106). As the self-declared legitimate occupants of Australia, the use of policy and practice proved important tools for the British to maintain and expand colonisation (Gulson, Parkes 2010, p. 300). In particular, the policies during the period of colonisation were used to manage the Aboriginal population and formed the basis for establishing the Board for the Protection of Aborigines 1983 (Cth). However, the board did not have any statutory power until the passage of the Aborigines Protection Act 1909 (Cth) (. From this Act emerged the child removal policy which allowed the APB to assume full control and custody of any Indigenous child if the court ruled that the child’s welfare was at risk (Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC)). Amendments to the Act in 1915 significantly increased the APB’s power and stripped the rights of parents, authorising the systematic removal of Aboriginal children without the requirement of a court order (Australian Human Rights Commission n.d.). Maddison (2013, p. 289) states the purpose of the child removal policy was to ‘erase Indigenous presence’ and assimilate them into European society. The survivors of these policies are called The Stolen Generations and involve several …show more content…
2; Sherwood 2013, p. 35). Research has shown that trauma is intensified when it is inflicted by those whose purpose is believed to be one of protection. This especially applies to Aboriginal people, who have experienced systemic attacks on their existence through past and present policies executed under the guise of protection and welfare (Nadew, 2012, p. 2). According to Sherwood (2013, p. 36), when left unresolved, the trauma transfers between generations resulting in the experience of negative psychological and physiological health problems directly related to the anguish and suffering experienced by past generations. In particular, the effect of the child removal policy has impacted generations of children belonging to the victims, manifesting in behaviours linked to avoidance, anxiety and intrusive thoughts, which are further complicated by substance and alcohol abuse, self-harm. Additionally, transgenerational trauma has been linked to higher levels of violence; family and intimate partner violence; resulting in disproportionate rates of Aboriginal incarceration (Nadew 2012, p. 3). Sherwood (2013, p. 33) claims the continued persistence of colonist ideology in government policies continues to impact the wellbeing of Indigenous people. Further, failure of governments to properly

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Over many years the introduction of legislations and policies by the Australian Government has had detrimental impacts upon Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. This essay will focus on Aboriginal Australians and will examine the legislation and the subsequent impact upon Aboriginal people and their culture. The legislations discussed will highlight how the Australian Government utilized policy to control every aspect of Aboriginal Australian’s lives. The ongoing implications of these policies as well as the current legislations concerning Aboriginal Australians will be discussed. The arrival of European settlers in 1788 marked the end of a peaceful existence for Aboriginal Australians.…

    • 816 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The political and legal system in Australia has provided both advances and setbacks for the Indigenous Australians. There have been many setbacks for Aboriginal people in their fight for equal legal and political rights like the legislation 's, constitution, voting rights and parliamentary laws. They have also had some gradual advances from the amendments to the electoral act, the 1967 referendum and Prime Minister Whitlams actions to give land back. Early on in Australia 's history Indigenous people had many setbacks in their political and legal rights. The Stolen Generation was a big setback for Aboriginal people.…

    • 1120 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    These situations commenced shortly after the settlement of the British including, being kicked off their land, being forced into reserves or missions, having to go through the Stolen Generation period because of policies such as segregation protection and assimilation which were made up by the Protection Board who were supposed to be put in place to protect them. These issues have lead onto other issues that are still current within today’s society such as the over-representation of the Indigenous population who come in contact with the justice system despite new legislation and policies that have been put in place to help the Indigenous population such as the Australian Human Rights Commission Act 1986 and Racial Discrimination Act…

    • 1401 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    As an act of retaliation the islanders and aboriginals developed a challenge to target the high court along with the help of the Eddie Mabo in order to lead them in action. Using information from source five in the retroactive textbook, the map showcases a reference according to the location of the Aboriginals and Torres Strait islanders new ground after their ownership of Australian territory was declared terra nullius. It is a demonstration of the location that the islanders were taken. The Queensland government had taken them away from their native land that they once had a connection to and moved majority of them to the Murray islands. Also, the substantiation from source six captures a moment of Eddie Mabo in attendance at the Supreme Court in Queensland.…

    • 1950 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    As a result of childhood bullying, cliques are formed at older ages, harassment intensifies, and the long-term adverse effects can be sickening. To begin with, bullying forms cliques because others are afraid they…

    • 1047 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    189-191). Police discretion can involve prejudice against indigenous communities because they are continuously under surveillance by law enforcement agencies, which leads to overrepresentation of Aboriginals in the justice system (La Prairie, 2002, pp. 189-191). However, over-policing can also be influenced by presence of actual crime in these indigenous neighbourhoods because Aboriginals experience poverty to a greater extent that causes them to commit criminal activities including theft, burglary or joining gangs (Fitzgerald & Carrington, 2008, pp.…

    • 888 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Parental Education Levels’ and Family/ Domestic Violence Domestic violence is defined as the infliction of physical harm or injury on an intimate partner or family member. This form of violence is typically found in families where the aggression is geared between the parents. This form of violence not only affects the perpetrator and the victim, it affects those who witness and are exposed to the violent abuse as well. Violence that occurs in the family can cause detrimental effects to those witnessing the abuse, which in families are most likely children. Families that experienced family violence have been shown to experience increased incidences of substance abuse, eating disorders, adolescent violence, runaways, sexual aggression, early…

    • 1636 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    These ideas were shaped by the ideas of racial superiority of the Europeans and the inevitable dying of the Indigenous Australians. This idea of the Aboriginal people dying out was expressed in the works of Daisy Bates’s book, The passing of The Aborigines (1938). These ideas further cemented the policies of protection and the creation of missions and reserves in order to ‘protect’ Indigenous Australians by moving people to reserves and missions where non-Indigenous authorities and missionaries would ‘smooth the dying pillow’. New South Wales appointed a Protector of Aborigines in 1881, and in 1883 a Board for the Protection of Aborigines was established, with the Aborigines Protection Act being introduced in 1909 (New South Wales Government, 1909). These Acts and Boards aimed to ‘protect’ the Indigenous Australians, however it ultimately led to the lives of Indigenous people being controlled by the Aborigines Protection Board.…

    • 1538 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Lastly, sexual abuse is where a child is molested, or becomes the victim of unwanted sexual advances by someone else (Dictionary). All of these types of child maltreatment can have a large impact on a child in very harmful ways, and can even cause trauma leaving the child with lasting negative effects. Child abuse is obviously a problem, the impact of child maltreatment on a child can be harmful because it can cause mental and physical related problems for the child, and it can lead to long-lasting effects on the child. It is widely seen that having the experience of childhood maltreatment leads to an increase of abuse among the offspring. However, obviously there are still many cases of child abuse happening, more than it should, therefore this paper will look to analyze how child maltreatment, more specifically physical, psychological, and sexual abuse affects a child.…

    • 1664 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Historically, from the outset Indigenous people were excluded from the Constitution and deemed an inferior race with British colonizers aim to eventually wipe Indigenous people out or have the assimilate into colonised way of life (Rolls 2001, 7). This notion and idea of race as Langton argues is an out-dated ideology, a western idea that helped support colonialism which has been deeply ingrained into Australian society. Theorist, Albert Memmi talks about colonised and the coloniser, furthermore Memmi discusses that successful colonisation of one group over another requires two things being; the oppressed themselves accepting the role in which they have been given and the creation of an oppressor being inherently dominant and controlling in nature. Memmi’s studies coincide with Langton’s argument, drawing upon the UN declaration of the Rights on Indigenous people which directly states, “Affirming doctrines, policies and practises based on advocating superiority of people or individuals based on national origin and or racial or cultural differences are scientifically false and legally invalid” (Langton 2016,…

    • 1170 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays

Related Topics