Impact Of Paul Revere's Contribution To The Revolution

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All eyes were on England and their colonies in the mid to late 1700’s. Other countries were watching the escalating tensions between the British Colonies and their mother country. To have the audacity to completely mount a rebellion was unheard of, although, the Colonists were left with no choice. England’s actions were radical and disrespectful at the least, and without them, there would not have been a revolution. England brought the revolution upon themselves, by enforcing the Currency Act, the Intolerable Acts and by fighting in the battles of Lexington and Concord.
Since the British colonies were sapping all of the gold coinage out of the colonies, the colonies started printing their own paper bake notes, which quickly took the place of
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He had many conflicts with the British law and proved himself to be a true revolutionist. One of his many contributions to the war was his engraving of the Boston Massacre. He created his own propaganda of the event. He made it seem like the colonists were not fighting back against the British, and that the colonists had done nothing to deserve an open fire response from the soldiers. This made the people hate the soldiers even more, since they thought that the soldiers had just begun to shoot the colonists for no reason. Revere spurred on the revolution by turning more people against the crown with his propaganda. Another contribution was his most famous Midnight Ride, where he rode 18 miles from Boston, through Lexington and then on to Concord. He rode yelling, “The British are coming!” This allowed the militias to prepare for battle, so the British soldiers would not surprise the colonists. He also warned the political leaders like John Hancock and Sam Adams, since they were traitors and if caught by the British they would be sent back to England and hung for treason. Revere did a lot to help the revolution in many …show more content…
They were a secret underground society, created to protest the Stamp Act. The Stamp Act was a tax on all paper goods, cards, newspapers, and legal documents. The people were not happy with yet another form of taxation without representation, so the Sons of Liberty was formed to protest these taxes. The Sons of Liberty were dedicated to protecting the rights of the colonists. They often fought against parliament, and forced several parliament representatives to resign. The Sons of Liberty were the group that was responsible for the Boston Tea Party; they dressed up like Native Americans and dumped an entire ships worth of tea into the Boston Harbor. The Daughters of Liberty were calmer when it came to helping the revolution. They helped enforce boycotts by teaching people how make their own goods and therefore, not have to buy them from the British. They taught people how to knit, sew, and cook. They also found substitutes for basic British goods; for example they figured out that tea could be made from boiling basil

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