Essay On Hungarian Emigration

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There have been several waves of the Hungarian emigration to the United States of America. Approximately 1.5 million Hungarian person leaved their home country during the last four decades until World War One (majority of whom were unskilled workers).
The first wave of Hungarian emigration to the USA was in 1849 and 1850 after the defeat of the war of independence. They fled from retribution by Austrian authorities. They were mainly from the educated classes. At that time approximately 650-700.000 Hungarians migrated to the USA. Apart from the independence gentry warriors or in other words the “Fourty-Eighters” agricultural workers left the country too. They tried to establish their own settlements but with less luck. By 1860, 2,710 Hungarians lived in the US, and at least 99 of them fought in the Civil War. Their motivations were not so much antislavery as a belief in democracy, a taste for adventure, and solidarity with their American neighbours.
The second Hungarian wave was mostly poor and uneducated immigrants seeking a better life in America. The majority of the 2 million immigrants from the Kingdom of Hungary were not ethnic Hungarians but belonged to the Slavic, Romanian or German minorities.
An increase of immigration from Hungary was also observed after
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1/3 of them would leave the country for good. Specially among the 18-20 year old people this question is popular and according to a survey ½ of them would stay abroad. Nowadays many young skilled workers, who just graduated do not find a proper job so they try to find jobs abroad, where the wages are higher than in Hungary. Especially doctors, engineers, and IT specialists. This kind of emigration purpose were never been present apart from the following years of the world wars and revolutions. Specially true for the time of Orbán Government when there was a huge increase in the numbers of permanently moved to the USA, the number of people reached

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