Human Nature In Lord Of The Flies Essay

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The classic novel Lord of the Flies is William Golding’s method of expressing his world view and what he thinks of human nature. He believes that humans are innately evil, with destructive and violent tendencies that are locked away by a society that condemns such behavior. His use of allegories in this book helps him to further discuss his opinions about how the world is cruel and selfish, but predictable. Most of the things that happen to these young boys are chilling, but Golding believes that they are inevitable in a world where society does not rein. The novel begins when the conch is found and blown by Ralph, calling the first meeting of many. As the other children appear, a hierarchy is subconsciously established due to the large …show more content…
Jack decides that he is going to “kill a pig and give a feast” and “leave some of the kill for” the Beast (133). They kill a sow, also killing off any offspring that they could have hunted in the future, in a gruesome and torturous manner. Her head is cut off and jammed onto a stick sharpened at both ends. Simon cannot get the image of “infinite cynicism of adult life” out of his head (137). He sees the Lord of the Flies “grinn[ing]” at him (138) and hallucinates it talking to him, saying things he already knows, but does not want to believe. He could never put into proper terms that the Beast is inside everyone. There is no escaping it. He finds the parachutist when he wakes from his faint and releases him from his “indignity” (147). Simon knows now “the beast is harmless and horrible” (147), in that the physical aspect they they have been scared of it not what they should be worried about. He must tell the others …show more content…
Ralph’s group goes to Castle Rock and brings the conch with them, figuring that Jack and his people will see it and value order and civilization once again. They are lacking reason themselves by believing that Jack would think the same way as them, but the symbol of their reason and intelligence – Piggy’s glasses – is gone. “Roger, with a sense of delirious abandonment” let the boulder go tumbling down during Ralph and Jack’s fight (180). It knocks Piggy off the cliff and onto a rock, splitting his head open. The conch is shattered “into a thousand white fragments” (181). Two things are lost in this instant: all intelligence and civilization the group had

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