Human Cloning: The Characteristics Of Humans?

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“There really is no need for human cloning” (Oscategui 1). Scientists and philosophers often debate the issue of human cloning and whether clones possess traits that qualify them as human or not. First, clones display characteristics of humans in the emotional and personality sense, but the purpose of a clone’s life differs from humans. Next, clones lack a biological manner of production, but clones still possess the same body parts and physical characteristics of a human body. Lastly, the unstable process of cloning automatically guarantees the clones who are successfully produced to live a shortened life, although humans also live shortened lives due to illness and disease. A portion of people consider clones as humans, but scientific and …show more content…
In human fertilization, the sperm fertilizes the egg and then an embryo forms thereafter. An embryo receives two sets of chromosomes: one set from the mother and one set from the father. The chromosomes are responsible for the genetic coding and DNA of the embryo; therefore, the responsibility of genetic variation lies on the chromosomes. Clones come from a scientific process called the somatic cell nuclear transfer or SCNT. During this process, scientists remove the chromosomes from the egg cell and replace them with the nucleus of a somatic cell which contains two sets of chromosomes. Since the nucleus of the somatic cell comes from a human who already displays genetic variation from their mother and father, the clone will receive both of their sets of chromosomes from one cell, and not from both the egg and sperm cells (“What is Cloning?” 1). Therefore, this produces an exact copy of DNA and the resulting clone displays no genetic variation from the person they share DNA with. Moreover, this classifies clones as non human because humans born from conception do not contain exact DNA of one of their parents. Nevertheless, scientists refute the debate of genetic variation with an argument that describes the physical body of a clone and not where clones come from. For example, scientists conclude that …show more content…
“For every 1000 tries, only one to 30 clones are made. Or you can look at it as 970 to 999 failures in 1000 tries” (“What are the Risks of Cloning?” 1). When scientists clone humans, they start with individual cells and use the somatic cell nuclear transfer method. Cells fail when the somatic cell and the egg fail to work together and when the cells fail to divide properly (“What are the Risks of Cloning?” 1). The 970 to 999 cells that fail in early life are not considered human because they do not possess human traits. Organs that make up humans allow them to move and think independently while a cell makes up the organs. Only a minescule fraction of a human comes from a single cell; therefore, this rules out a cell as a human. Next, only about one to thirty clones succeed in production for every thousand tries and often develop defects like “Large Offspring Syndrome,” which causes an enlargement of the clone’s organs, “...kidney or brain malfunctions, and impaired immune systems” (“What are the Risks of Cloning?” 1). Although these clones will not die as cells, they will eventually die earlier than the average human because of their vulnerability to defects and their weak immune systems. Nevertheless, a portion of humans often die early due to undetected medical conditions,

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