Embodiment In Hinduism

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One of the more unique aspects of Hinduism is the belief in a Supreme Being, although it may be by different name or embodiment, the belief is consistent that they are all one and the same, or reflections of the same, and the choice of embodiment is left to the devotee. Hindus also believe in many other Gods who may have a greater connection with certain aspects of life and they may choose to honor those Gods in their practice as well; however, they still hold to the belief of a “Supreme Being”. This also opens up another unique aspect of Hindu tradition that of tolerance. For many religions there is only one “true” god and by default there can not be any other, this thought process cannot exist in Hindu practice where each household may …show more content…
While both of these traditions have coexisted side by side and their influences on each other can be seen in certain aspects there are several distinct differences between the two traditions. For example both religions include a belief in Karma; however, there are differences in how each tradition treats or includes the concept in their tradition. Using the previous overview of Hinduism as a basis for comparison we can look further to the differences and similarities of these two …show more content…
And that “the sacred literature of the Jains is said to have been transmitted by the Jain Mahavira to his followers, but it is not believed to have originated with him”(157). The concept was that he put for the ideas and they were inturned shared again “by each succeeding prophet”(157). As a result their sacred “canon (Agama) for many years existed as a purely oral tradition”(158).They do share similarities however in their construction, in that they both have sections or areas that speak to different collections of knowledge or theory. Such as thoughts on philosophy, conduct, and including dialogues on topics.
In Hinduism there 's a concept of a Supreme Being however in Jainism there is no God or Supreme Being, “some Jains also worship Hindu deities such as Sri Lakshmi”(148). Although the are not Gods Jains they do hold a high place for the “24 Jains who, through their teaching, created a ford across the ocean samsara”(182). Belief in “Tirthankaras” is distinguishing traditional belief for Jains who hold the concept of pure beings who have crossed over into liberation as a source and focus of the “Jain devotional apparatus” (150). Tirthankaras, are not a God but a pure Soul who shows the way to liberation or

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