Explain What Is Meant By The Phrase 'Hindsight Is 20/20'

Improved Essays
Madison Verschleiser
Social Studies

Hindsight is 20/20

The narrative of World War is one best explained by the phrase, “hindsight is 20/20”. Many countries entered World War Two believing it was in their national interest only for the end result to be significantly different than what they had expected. While the ideas of aggressive nationalism and militarism served as Germany and England’s national interest in the war, by entering the U.S hoped to have a say in the ultimate peace agreement at the end of the war, however in the end, despite Ally victory, no party achieved its goals.
In Germany, the ideas of militarism and aggressive nationalism lead to Germany’s desire to expand its sphere of influence. When the war broke out Germany saw it as an easy win and opportunity to expand its sphere of influence while proving once and for all, that it was the strongest
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With Germany’s growing navy, Germany posed a direct threat to England’s power. Not only did Britain see Germany as a direct threat to Britain, but also it was in Britain national interest to get involved in the war because if they didn’t get involved Germany would become too powerful. What Britain didn’t foresee was the long road it had ahead; the often repeated phrase, “the war will be over by Christmas,” reflecting Britain’s unconcern attitude towards the war, ended up being devastatingly different from the ultimate outcome. The four bloody years of battle that would follow turned the legacy of the war from one of victory to one of mourning for the thousands who lost their life over a trivial cause. As a non-European country, America’s reasoning for entering the war was much different than the power struggle going on in

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