Impact Of Harlem Renaissance On African American Culture

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Exploring African-American Culture: The Harlem Renaissance
The Harlem Renaissance started in 1920, in Harlem, New York. The Harlem Renaissance created a big uproar of the African American Culture when they emigrated from the south to north. It expressed the African American culture and brought it alive. The Harlem Renaissance unified other races, making African American culture, a trend. The Harlem Renaissance contributed to the growth of the emerging African American culture in the post slavery USA because it allowed African American the freedom of speech and expression through music, art, and literature, which wasn’t allowed during slavery. Many artists, poets, singers, theatre’s, and musicians took part in the Harlem movement, which gave them a voice in society.
In 1920, the Harlem Renaissance involved many outstanding African Americans that made a difference in America. The
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Many artists, poets, singers, theatre’s and musicians participated in the Harlem movement, which gave them a voice in society. Many of the African Americans have recognition for the cultural work they 've accomplished, Harlem Renaissance was a time for the African American community to reunite with other races in the rural south. The Harlem Renaissance was beneficial for the African Americans because they were able to express themselves not only through cultural purposes, but also of who they were individually. Leaders of the Harlem Renaissance movement inspired other races to reunite as one, which allowed the African American culture to become a trend. The Harlem Renaissance inspired the young, black, men and women, to create a new work environment and spread their culture, instead of living the lifestyle of an American

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