Harlem Renaissance Impact On Literature

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Originally called the New Negro Movement, the Harlem Renaissance began in the 1920’s in Harlem, which is a community that resides in Manhattan, New York City (Haskins, 1941). It created a new black cultural identity and it had an effect on African American literature. The Harlem Renaissance had such an effect on African American culture that it changed the way African Americans were perceived; it was said to be the rebirth of the Harlem Renaissance through its’ leading intellectuals and its’ writers who broke through racial barriers (Haskins, 1941). The Harlem Renaissance was the first time mainstream publishers and critics took African American literature seriously. During this time period, African Americans began to express a pride in being …show more content…
Their writings and philosophies helped African Americans develop a new sense of confidence amongst themselves. Three of the greatest writers during the Harlem Renaissance were Zora Neale Hurston, Countee Cullen, and Jessie Redman Fauset. Each of these writers changed African American culture through their novels, poetry, and short …show more content…
Had it not been for the Harlem Renaissance, African American literature would not exist so prevalently in today’s society. It was difficult for black northerners to avoid being victimized by the pervasive determination among white people to segregate society. Unless they were servants of white guests, taverns, hotels, and resorts in the north turned black people away. They were also banned from public lecture halls, religious revivals, and art exhibits. If they wanted to go to the movies or church, they had to sit in the “Negroes Only” section. Had it not been for these leading intellectuals and these writers of the Harlem Renaissance, African Americans would not have come as far as they have had it not been for the intellectuals such as W.E.B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Alain Locke, and Marcus Garvey. These intellectuals gave writers such as Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston the push they needed to make the impacts they made on black culture. The Harlem Renaissance promoted racial equality and integration. It gave African Americans a new sense of pride and confidence in their

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