Hamlets Insincerity In William Shakespeare's Hamlet

1896 Words 8 Pages
Register to read the introduction… With certain people, Hamlet is resolved to get revenge for his father’s death. With other people, this thought is the last thought in his mind. If he had any of the resolve he had showed earlier, his act of revenge would have already been completed. Instead of playing the part of the vengeful son, or dropping the issue entirely, he spends the entire act “slacking off';. He avoids the decision he has to make and pretends to be mad. This is shown when he says to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, "I know not-lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises" (2.2.280-281). Later Hamlet tells Rosencrantz and Guildenstern that he is just faking his madness when he says, "I am but mad north-north-west. When the wind is southerly, I know a hawk from a handsaw" (2.2.347-348). By Hamlet admitting that he is faking, he is truly saying that he is comfortable with it. It is strange that Hamlet is comfortable with playing at this point, but the main concept is that he is not acting out the role that he established in act …show more content…
Hamlet makes this big buildup of what he should have done and how he will seek revenge, but then contradicts himself in his next statement. After all of the swearing and support, he backs out again. He can’t decide whether to play the role or not. Being caught in the middle, Hamlet decides that he needs more proof of the King’s guilt. He keeps going back on his resolve when he says, "The play’s the thing wherein I’ll catch the conscience of the King" (2.2.559-560). Hamlet believes that acting will transform one’s inner self to match the …show more content…
He does not hesitate and fully embraces the act. In reaction to Ophelia’s death, he is again behaving as he should have. She was his love and he should have loved her more than her brother. This is shown when Hamlet says, "I loved Ophelia. Forty thousand brothers could not with their quantity of love make up my sum" (5.1.243-245). Hamlet should have loved her, but he did not. Had he loved her he would not have treated her so poorly earlier. He is now committed to acting, and loving Ophelia fits the role. In the rest of the play Hamlet sticks to his resolve. He barely has time to tell his story of escape to Horatio before he is challenged. He does not refuse the challenge because as nobility, he cannot refuse he has to keep his honor. Hamlet goes to the match and because he has now accepted the role, he does not hesitate to kill the King when prompted to do

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