Greek And Roman Dress Essay

2017 Words 9 Pages
Society, Religion, & Politics in Greek & Roman Dress To some, dress may be seen as just the clothing one wears to get through the tasks of daily life. However, to the women in ancient Greek and Roman society, dress was influenced by so much more than just their own personal choices and styles. There were similarities and differences in the roles of women in these societies, but there seem to be common themes of women being forced to dress modestly and men being more dominant in each society. It is important to understand that the way these women dressed was not simply an extension of their personality, but was controlled and shaped by societal factors around them. Social, religious and political influences affected the roles of women in ancient …show more content…
In the classical period of ancient Greece, around 500-300 BCE, society was becoming increasingly democratic and better educated. However, these opportunities for education were afforded to men, and women were seen as inferior in society. Women had no property rights, stayed out of the public eye, and lived a quiet, hidden life within their homes. Their accepted purpose in society was to have children and maintain the household, which implied that men had political control of society and women had no say in the laws. Llewellyn-Jones compares the style of ancient Greek houses with the style of women’s clothing of the time. Llewellyn-Jones explains that “the connection between the veil and the house is a pertinent theme in Greek gender constructions…” (251). He explains that the idea of a roof and a woman’s head covering is similar, as both can be used to cover her, protect her chastity, and limit her contact with other men, as a way of exercising greater control over her. The veils that these Greek women wore had openings for the eyes, and were secured by a fillet and a brooch (252). In this society, a woman …show more content…
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Llewellyn-Jones, Lloyd. “House and Veil in Ancient Greece.” British School at Athens Studies, vol. 15, 2007, pp. 251–258. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/40960594.
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Rothe, Ursula. “The ‘Third Way’: Treveran Women’s Dress and the ‘Gallic Ensemble.’” American Journal of Archaeology, vol. 116, no. 2, 2012, pp. 235–252. JSTOR, JSTOR,

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