Gioachino Rossini Analysis

Improved Essays
If you’d asked audiences in 1825 to name the most popular composer of the day, it would not have been Beethoven, it would have been Gioachino Rossini. From the time Tancredi premiered in 1813, Rossini’s operas were the most popular and influential all over Europe, in part because he blended the elements of opera buffa and opera seria into works that appealed to audiences from a wide range of nationalities and class.

Rossini was born on Leap Year Day in 1792 in Pesaro, Italy on the Adriatic Coast. His mother was an opera singer and his father a horn and trumpet player. As a child he performed professionally as a singer, most often in churches. The family traveled frequently to perform in operas, finally settling in Bologna in 1804 where his
…show more content…
Rosina opens the duet singing “Dunque io son tu non m'inganni? Dunque io son la fortunata!” (Then it is I … You are not mocking me? Then I am the fortunate girl!) in bel canto style. (Often the Rosina will enliven the “fortunata” with a trill and hold as long as possible.) When she sings “Gia' me l'ero immaginata: lo sapeva pria di te” (But I had already guessed it, I knew it all along), listen for her rapid descending trills: G down to B in half steps, repeat, then D down to A, repeat, C to G, repeat, and so on, all in sixteenth notes; this, as you will hear, requires uncommon agility! Figaro soon echoes her with trills of his own: “Oh, che volpe sopraffina, ma l'avra' da far con me.” (Oh, what a cunning little fox! But she'll have to deal with me.) What Rossini does here is create dramatic conflict in the text while creating harmony in the music. Figaro, of course, thinks he has to persuade Rosina, but the music tells us that they are united in wanting the same thing. Figaro then asks her to write just two lines to “Lindoro” (the count’s disguise); they humorously spar back and forth with Rosina claiming shyness and so on, before Rosina takes the already completed letter from her bosom. She then sings “Fortunati affetti miei! Io comincio a respirar” (Fortune smiles on my love, I can breathe once more). There are more trills, higher notes (even a high A, about as high as a mezzo usually sings) and faster runs up and down the scale, especially when she sings, “Ah, tu solo, amor, tu sei che mi devi consolar” (Oh, you alone, my love, can console my heart) where the line goes from middle G down to B then rapidly up to D then back to B and so on, again all in sixteenth notes. Figaro echoes her vocal line while complaining (quite cheerfully!) about the vagaries of women. Often the singers overtly flirt with each other and the tone of the entire duet is

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    The principal, "Harlequin," exhibited beguiling soprano lines over rehashed designs making utilization of dissonance and humor was dependably musically understandable. At that point, "Moondrunk," which had a strong solo by Marques Jerrell Ruff, had charming harmonies. I would say that he got the most beautiful voice among them all. A third of the set was gotten with joy by the…

    • 889 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Concert Review Sample

    • 2119 Words
    • 9 Pages

    It begins roughly the same way that “Angus Dei” did. The dynamics were a bit different in this piece and the dynamics changed as well. The first part is one of the tenor soloists and the flowing sound of her notes is ever changing. They begin smoothly with her words one flowing into the next one and then in and out her words become more separated as she breaths between each one. This pattern continues as the volume of her solo greatens.…

    • 2119 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    She was the daughter of Lucia Gagnolandi and Giulio Caccini. In addition, her mother was a member of a group of women performers in Florence that sang in the seventeenth century (Caccini). After changes to the ensemble, Francesca Caccini and her students joined and took part in various theatrical events and intimate performances (Caccini). Around 1602, the ensemble merged with a group of men that performed during HOLY WEEK in the Medici parish church in Santa Felicita (Caccini). Caccini became a singer, instrumentalist, and composer for the Medici court (Emerson 28).…

    • 1661 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Music Concert Critique

    • 1387 Words
    • 6 Pages

    There is a long melisma during the progression of the bass, tenor, alto and soprano. Osanna represents Bach’s skill to ornament and expand different techniques and designs with various styles and this sections are based off secular music. Osanna ends in ritornello and simulates Gigue dance music. I felt like this piece was trying express to joy and excitement based off of how the chorus was singing this movement. They were practically shouting, “Hosanna is the highest,” showing enthusiastic praise.…

    • 1387 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    The second movement opened up a new world for listeners and composers around the world. Instruments that were only used in operas such as the bass drum, crash cymbals, and triangle, were used in the second movement of Haydn’s Military Symphony. The audience loved it and had never seen those kinds of instruments incorporated into a Symphony. The whole symphony is an exquisite work of art, from the second and third movements of bold and playful melodies by the oboe and flutes, to the energetic fourth movement, Finale…

    • 1009 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Ferra To Feforge Analysis

    • 293 Words
    • 2 Pages

    From the original version, the notion of lucid dreaming was always felt within the melody, yet the sweet and rough approach, notably felt through the violin, is a characteristic that levels the sensitivity. The change between lead vocals from Ferrara to LaForge by the second verse is a powerful tactic when driving a full range of emotions to the table. LaForge's vocals revisit the dreamy aspect of the track and remind a listener of relatability. The track wouldn't be complete without the natural harmonization which brings the overall cover to life.…

    • 293 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Because of his high position and importance at the Pieta, he was allowed to leave in order to travel. He soon became involved with a lady named Anna Giraud. She was a singer that Vivaldi met while he served Phillip von Hessen who was the Governor of Mantua. Vivaldi invited Anna and her sister to travel with him and become female soloists for his operas (“Classical Net”). Although Vivaldi always acknowledged his relationship with the women to be just as friends, his escapades with Anna caused the church to deny his return to work (Gordon…

    • 785 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Viola had in the process fallen in love with Orsino, with his noticings, and the way he talked about her. It had in turn began the turnings of a love triangle. P#2: Viola is told to be a messenger of Orsino’s love to Olivia, he tells Viola to confess his love, and how he wants nothing but here. This proves a bit complicated because Viola herself wants to Marry Orsino. After saying, “I’ll do my best/ To woo your lady…” Viola is besides herself, saying, “Yet, a barful strife--/ Whoe’er I woo, myself would be his wife.” (Twelfth Night Act I.IV).…

    • 1136 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    When asked what she would do as the Duke, Viola would, “write loyal cantons of contemned love and sing them loud even in the dead of night”( ) Viola would sing romantic poems outside Olivia’s house as a proclamation of love. At this, Olivia is hooked, “What is your parentage”( ), Olivia falls in love with Viola’s romantic heart, and wants to know more about her. Because of this, Olivia falls in love with Viola’s heart, something Sebastian does not…

    • 1209 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    The Baroque Period

    • 1576 Words
    • 7 Pages

    A time of emotion driven and self expressing music, the Romantic period utilised instruments like the contrabassoon, xylophone, drum, celeste and piccolo. As mentioned previously, Beethoven’s music paved the way for composers of the Romantic Period such as Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt, Richard Wagner and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Previous rules were thrown out the window in order to create new sounds filled with passion. Operas like Giuseppe Verdi’s La traviata became very popular showcasing the evolution of opera from the Baroque Period, all the way to modern day musicals like the previously mentioned ones. Franz Liszt composed the first ‘tone poem’ or ’symphonic poem’, an orchestral composition that is based off of a non-musical piece of work.…

    • 1576 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays