Caring For Patients From Different Culture By Geri-Salala Summary

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Childbirth: easily one of the happiest moments a human being could ever experience. However, for some parts of the world, such as India, people are not able to experience such a feeling as parents, nor are they able to keep their newborn alive for more than a few weeks. According to The World Bank, India’s infant mortality rate is estimated to be at 38/1000 deaths. Compared to the United States who are only sitting at 6/1000 deaths. Taking this into consideration, what would it be like if a Hindu couple decided to have their baby in the United States? Geri-Ann Galanti provides the answer in her novel “Caring for patients from different cultures” by documenting an Indian nurse, Leila, who recalls the experience of having her first child …show more content…
To conclude, I definitely believe that it is important for healthcare professionals to always communicate with their patients. Failure to do so or misunderstanding the importance of this golden rule can lead to damaged reputations, legal issues, trust issues with the healthcare system and violation of an ethnic individual’s right to equality.

Overall, through various examples shown throughout Geri-Ann Galanti’s case study, I think there is enough evidence to support the idea that Hindus are better off having their child in America; as opposed to India. But at the same time, her case also shined the spotlight on how things can be difficult if there is no open communication between the doctor and the patient. Things such as knowing what is important to the patient and how to go about communicating with them about such beliefs, values and their worldview. She also highlighted some potentially negative impacts of not having proper or effective communication. That is exactly why it is necessary for healthcare professionals to always communicate fluently with their patients so that they are treated fairly and with respect. Because, to be ready and focused on ensuring that ethnic patients are treated properly and with great respect is above all else, the utmost of importance to medical

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