Free Will And Fate In Macbeth By William Shakespeare

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William Shakespeare, England’s greatest and most influential poet, was born in 1564 AD in Stratford-upon-Avon, United Kingdom and died in 1616. Shakespeare is widely considered to be one of, if not the, greatest writers of all time due to his notably unique and intricate style of writing. No other writer’s works have been produced so many times or read as widely in so many countries throughout history. Although Shakespeare technically only possessed the education of an eighth grader, he had the lexicon far surpassing even modern day individuals with a PhD. His exceptional ability to select specific words from his massive vocabulary allowed him to apply said words situationally in order to best represent a mood or feeling within his writing. …show more content…
It is the power and ability to act at one’s own discretion. Fate, on the other hand, is the will, principal, or determining cause by which the development of events are believed to come to be as they are beyond a person’s control. William Shakespeare’s Macbeth is a tragic play that describes the bloody rise and tragic downfall of King Macbeth in medieval Scotland. The origin of Macbeth’s status as a tragic figure derives from an encounter between Macbeth and the three witches that lead to his rise to the throne, his decline into tyranny, and his demise. In Macbeth, each individual character’s destiny appears to be preset by fate. Thus raising the fundamental question of what influences the destiny of an individual. Macbeth makes numerous decisions that has profound effect on his life regardless of the intention. Therefore, one may contemplate if they are his decisions or if it is the master plan of his life, fate. Many of the individuals and events in the play, Macbeth, demonstrate that fate plays an influential role in the …show more content…
Although he seems to possess the free will to act upon his own decisions, he often follows the predicted path, doing what others predict or wish. The three weird sisters approach Macbeth with prophecies that will all come true in the future. Although, it would appear to some that Macbeth is just following destiny and fate at first, Macbeth continually had the decision throughout the play to select his own destiny. “All hail, Macbeth! Hail to thee, Thane of Glamis! All hail, Macbeth! Hail to thee, Thane of Cawdor! All Hail, Macbeth, that shalt be king hereafter!...Thou shalt get kings, though thou be none” (Act 1, Scene 3, Lines 51-70). From the beginning of the play, Macbeth and Banquo encounter three weird women that prophesize their destinies. The three weird woman make three predictions: Macbeth will gain the title of Thane of Cawdor, he will become the next king of Scotland, and Banquo will not be king but his sons will be. Although the prophecies were spoken, Macbeth’s fate was not sealed. Prior to encountering the three witches, Macbeth knew nothing of his destiny. However, after his confrontation with the witches, the idea of becoming the future monarch is planted within his mind. Therefore leading him to determine how he should act upon that prophecy and to dark decisions that would result in his demise. For instance, “Two truths are told as happy prologues to the

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