Feminism And Female Empowerment In Kate Chopin's The Awakening

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Women’s rights have been a major topic of discussion for an extremely long time. Women have been taught to bow down and obey men for generations upon generations. Women are currently recovering from (and some still facing) stereotyping, belittlement, and oppression. Women need to know that they are powerful too. They do have a voice and their voice should be heard. They are strong and independent and should not need to rely on a man for anything. Kate Chopin does an excellent job representing feminism in her novel, The Awakening. The Awakening is about a young woman, who is also a wife and a mother, struggling to find happiness in her war against oppression. This novel has countless amounts of incredible examples of feminism and female empowerment. …show more content…
This statement could not be more wrong. It teaches women to be independent individuals. Edna Pontellier loves her family, but is not a mother-woman. “They were women who idolized their children, worshiped their husbands, and esteemed it a holy privilege to efface themselves as individuals and grow wings as ministering angels” (Chopin 10). Edna does not have particularly strong maternal instincts, but that does not mean that she does not love her children. Edna is an independent individual and does not think that she should be required to do everything for everybody, especially if they are capable of handling it by themselves. A second way this novel teaches independent individualism is when Edna chose to go out by herself instead of with her husband. This shows feminism by showing women that they are strong, independent, and confident. They do not need to go out with a man in order to have a satisfying evening. She is perfectly capable of having fun without the interference of others. A third and final example of independent individualism is when Edna vows never to sacrifice her own happiness for anyone else, including her husband and her children. While this sounds like she is neglecting her children, she is not. She is expressing her individualism and independence. She thinks the person she should love most is herself, not her husband, not her kids. If she loves herself the most, she should not be obligated to sacrifice her own contentment and personal well-being for someone else’s. This novel does not teach women to neglect their children and husbands and deny the needs of their families. It simply teaches them to be independent individuals and to value their self-worth. Edna demonstrates her independent individualism by showing that she does not worship her husband or idolize her children, she does not need her husband in

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