Who Is Faustus Tragic Flaw?

Improved Essays
Jamel Torrence

Faustus fails to understand that human knowledge is flawed and this lack of understanding fuels his desire for omniscience. Faustus abandons the academic disciplines of logic, medicine, law, and divinity. Not only does he lose faith in academic discipline sequentially he studies magic, then sells his soul to the Devil in exchange for knowledge and power. Faustus’ pride becomes an obstacle that blinds him from his mistakes while trying to obtain unlimited knowledge. Faustus doubts the study of Logic with give him ultimate satisfaction for unlimited knowledge. He reflects on the Greek philosopher Aristotle quoting him, “Is to dispute well logic 's chiefest end? Affords this art no greater miracle? Then read no more, thou hast
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Faustus feels religion offers wider outlooks but does not trust it. He quotes St. Jerome’s bible about man sinning and how it equates to death. “ 'The reward of sin is death. ' That 's hard. 'If we say that we have no sin we deceive ourselves, and there 's no truth in us. ' Why then, belike we must sin and so consequently die.” (1.41-45). Faustus eagerness for unlimited knowledge is failing him from seeing the truth in his words. Sin reward death yet Faustus sins by agreeing to contract with Lucifer. He does not have faith in the knowledge of religion yet and it downfalls him. Had Faustus not been arrogant about his knowledge and not tried to push the limits of human knowledge, then he would not have failed his mission of obtaining unlimited …show more content…
Faustus talks with Mephistophilis, a devil, and still does not realize how erroneous his deal with the devil is even while conversing with him. "Come, I think hell 's a fable." (5.124). Faustus is showing his disbelief for religion by comparing Hell to a fable. He does not understand that Hell is much more real than he believes even with a devil standing in front of him.
Marlowe is showing Faustus at a point of no return, which is reoccurring for Faustus the more he continues with his education of evil. Marlowe is saying once one commits to something there is no turning back to what once was. Wrong doing cannot be repented because of sorrow. Willfully doing evil or wrong cannot be changed in Marlowe’s writing; once you decide to join evil you have made a permanent choice.
Consequently selling his soul becomes Faustus’ eventual expiration. At the end of the story Faustus’s cry for help is not heard. He is unable to repent and be forgiven for his sins therefore he is taken to hell. "Adders and serpents, let me breathe awhile! Ugly hell, gape not! come not, Lucifer! I 'll burn my books!-Ah Mephistophilis" (14. 111-113). Again, we see Faustus fail in being able to change his fortune and going back to his previous beliefs. His repent is not heard and he must follow through with the contract and go to Hell. Faustus pride blinded him to the contract he agreed to and this contract

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