Explanation Of Hooke's Law, Law Of Elasticity

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Serial Number Topic Page Number 1 Introduction 3
2 Theory

2.1. Definition
2.2. Spring arrangement
2.3 Series arrangement of springs
2.4. Parallel arrangement of springs 3
3 Methodology

3.1. Apparatus
3.2. Procedure 8
4 Results

4.1. parallel and series combination

4.2. Compression springs

4.3. Tension springs

4.4. Graph of Tension Spring, Compression spring, Parallel spring and the Series Spring 9
5 Discussion 14
6 Conclusion 15
7 Bibliography 15 Introduction
The spring is a wonder of human manufacturing and originality. A reason being its kinds, that is, the compression, the extension, the torsion, the coil springs and all have different uses and functions.
The experiment was done to prove the results for Hook’s
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Elastic behaviour of solids as per Hooke’s law can be understood by the minute displacements of their component molecules and atoms from usual positions are proportional to the force that leads to that displacement.

Theory
2.1) Definition: Hooke’s law states that, the force required to compress or expand a spring to some distance that is the comparatively minute deformation in spring to certain distance is directly proportional to the displacement or size of the deformation (Fig.1)
In simpler words, the law is a theory of physics that says that the force required to extend or compress a spring by a certain distance is directly proportional to that distance.
Also, when the force used to compress or extend the object attached to the spring is disconnected it would go back to its original shape.
Hooke’s law is the first classical example of an explanation of elasticity – which is the property of an object or material which causes it to be restored to its original shape after distortion. The phenomenon to recoil to normal shape after undergoing distortion can be called as “restoring force”. In the purview of the Hooke’s Law, this restoring force is proportional to the quantity of “stretch”
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Different springs were taken that were Tension, Compressed, series combination and Parallel Combination and when their spring constant and the graph was plotted between force(N) and displacement(x), it showed all the springs followed the hooks law that is the graph was linear that is the force applied was directly proportional to the displacement. In case of tensed, compressed and series combination springs it was found that the points close to the origin were very close to each other. On calculating the spring constant for the parallel and series combination, the value of spring constant(K) in case of parallel combination was found to be more than in case of the series

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