Examples Of Tragic Tragedy Of Brutus

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The archetype of a tragic hero has appeared in scores of great works; they are principled figures marred by major flaws that inexorably cause their downfall, in such a way that arouses pathos in the audience. In William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, Brutus is a classic tragic hero - presented as a virtuous man, his weaknesses lead him into the calamitous act of betraying a friend. It is the fatal flaws in Brutus’ own character that cause his fall from power and eventual death: his honour, which he will do anything to protect; his idealism, which contributes to a fatal naivety on his part; and his trusting nature, easily exploited by many.
As a Roman senator whose ancestor once quelled tyranny in Rome, Brutus had honour. He was highly regarded
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Before the assassination of Caesar, Brutus strives to justify what he and the other conspirators are about to do. While the other conspirators have selfish intentions such as desire for power or jealousy, noble Brutus is driven entirely by the well-being of his nation. He reminds the others that noble Romans do not betray “... the smallest particle / Of any promise that hath passed from him” (2.1 145-146); thus casting their plot to commit a brutal murder as a righteous undertaking and the conspirators as courageous and irreproachable men. Brutus strikes Caesar down in the name of emancipation, fearing that Caesar 's absolute power will make him view himself too highly, enslaving Rome to the will of a single man: “... not that I loved Caesar / less, but that I loved Rome more.” (3.2 22-23). After Caesar has been stabbed to death on the floor of the Senate, Brutus continues to glorify the murder as a blow for freedom and his credulousness misleads him into believing that he can convince everybody to see it in the same way. Idealistic and naive, he is unable to recognize Antony’s deceit and unaware of the power of raw emotion over intellect. The events following spiral completely out of his control as Rome is plunged into a civil war, causing he and Cassius’ to take their own lives. The idealistic vision Brutus has for Rome is completely shattered, and ultimately, assassinating …show more content…
Deceived and misguided by Cassius, who cleverly exploits Brutus’s overly trusting character, Brutus joins the conspiracy to assassinate Caesar. Cassius mainly uses flattery, convincing Brutus that he is genuine and has good intentions: “Your hidden worthiness into your eye, / That you might see your shadow...” (1.2 57-58). As someone who has been friends with Brutus for a while, Cassius knows him well and simply brings to the surface the tensions that already exist within him. Trusting Cassius is the catalyst to the events that eventually lead to Brutus’ downfall. Another character who takes advantage of Brutus’ trust is Antony - before the funeral oration, Brutus trusts that Antony will only speak good of the conspirators and their intentions. Even though Cassius warns him, “You know not what you do: / do not consent / That Antony speak in his funeral” (3.1 33-35), Brutus is confident that Antony will be able to gather the support of the Roman people. However, moments later, with Caesar’s will in his hand and tears on his cheeks, Antony is able to engage in a masterful rhetoric to stir the crowd to rebel against the conspirators. He persuades the audience to rescind their support, instead condemning Brutus and the others as traitors - turning against Brutus and breaching his trust. While trust is often a

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