Siddhartha Human Ethics

Improved Essays
Many argue that great men or woman generally shape history or change society in some way. These people present, typically controversial, ideas, theories, or models to society. In addition to affecting society and governments, great men, in some cases, have also founded or discovered religions. In particular religions, Buddhism and Christianity were both centered on the teachings of Siddhartha, 500 BCE, and Jesus, 4 B.C. . Furthermore, although distance, time, and culture separated persons, Siddhartha and Jesus, these individuals may be connected through their general lives and similar teachings—their fundamental human ethics. German Catholic theologian, Romano Guardini, wrote in his meditation on the life of Christ entitled The Lord, that …show more content…
In many religions, like Buddhism and Christianity, humans are considered to be sinful beings, or, at the very least, beings that live in sin. Though the Buddha taught that all humans were born from ignorance and craving and Jesus taught that human beings are related to original sin, both individuals acknowledge human sin and the dangers of sin. Without the characteristic of sin, one may argue that many religions may not have ethics. According to both Buddhism and Christianity all human beings are sinful, guilty and imperfect; therefore, the religious principles of morality or ethics are ways in which humans may purify themselves . Consequently, human sin is a baseline for both religions in which their shared ethics of love, unconditional friendliness, compassion, sympathetic joy, and equanimity aim to handle or correct. To display the ideal model of ethics, Buddhism and Christian traditions turn to the life’s and personalities of the Buddha and Christ—since their living embodiments are fraught with the religions’ fundamental virtues: love, compassion, etc. . This embodiment of ethics in the Buddha and Christ may be directly seen in past and present religious disciples who look to the Buddha or Christ as their spiritual …show more content…
In order for one to love, one may argue that he or she must exhibit unconditional friendliness to others and nature. In Buddhism, the ethic of love and unconditional friendliness is evidently found in the Buddha’s personality or outlook on his relationship with the surrounding world . In other words, the Buddha’s life and holy power is not the basis of Buddhist’s love ethic; rather, the ethic of love is based on his teachings of a persons’ action’s cause and effects—karma . Karma is the effects of one’s good—positive—or bad—negative—thoughts and actions . According to the Buddha’s teachings, each person is ultimately responsible for his or her actions—karma level . The Buddha is not a God; therefore, he cannot grant individual’s salvation or forgive people of their sins. In order to attain good karma, a Buddhist is encouraged to practice the dharma—the Buddha’s personal path to good karma and ultimately enlightenment—and follow the spiritual directions displayed by the Buddha . In one of his teachings on karma, the Buddha says, “make an island of yourself, make yourself your refuge; there is no other refuge. Make truth your island, make truth your refuge; there is no other refuge” . In addition, in addressing the Brahmins and householders of a particular village, the Buddha states, “A lay-follower reflects thus: How can I inflict upon others what is unpleasant to me? On account

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