Euthyphro Apology And Crito Analysis

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Throughout the work Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito, written by Greek philosopher Plato, Socrates is faced with moral and ethical challenges. In Euthyphro, Socrates attempts to convince Euthyphro that prosecuting his father might be sacrilegious, despite his duty as a citizen to report any crime committed. Socrates questions Euthyphro on what he believes piety to be, as a way for Euthyphro to understand the alternatives to directly turning his father in. This is followed by Socrates trial in the Apology, where he is being accused of corrupting the youth, not believing in the Gods, and believing in new divinity. Socrates attempts to defend himself, but the irony here, is that it’s certainly not an apology. Reader discover that Socrates is declared …show more content…
Socrates is has a strong moral, and ethical compass which is depicted through each of the stories. Even though Socrates was wrongly convicted, he was determined to stay in jail instead of escaping with Crito. Most people would jump at the opportunity to escape their wrongful death, and a new beginning. Socrates is able to stay level headed and understand how his escape would create more consequences for him. Cirto brings up the point that leaving his sons without a father is wrong, but Socrates reminds Crito that he would be doing worse by making his sons have a criminal for a father. Also he would be breaking everything Socrates stands for because he would break the social construct that he believed in, and become a hypocrite, by defying what he taught. By repaying evil with evil you are not achieving anything. This depicting how much Socrates focuses on being true to your moral values, and being ethical. Socrates also displayed his ability to question and not be so narrow minded. Our politics are so polarized right now, and there does not seem to be any middle ground or any attempt for people to attempt to understand the other side. Obvious Socrates doesn’t believe in what Euthyphro is saying about piety and impiety, but he does respect Euthyphro's opinions, and then presents questions so that Euthyphro might see some of the errors in his reasoning. Now a days, people are divided, and have such strong opinions they have no interest in understanding contrasting ideas. People are also to caught up in themselves to ever bother compromising we are stuck. Nothing productive is happening. Socrates is being put to death and he sets his needs aside to preserve the greater good. People have a narrow dogmatic view on things and with Socrates insight and strive for knowledge instead of being right, he would be able to bring reason into our political system. No doubt he would annoy everyone eventually with his constant

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