Elizabeth Cady Stanton: Women's Suffrage

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Most American women are unable to imagine a life spent obeying a man’s every command, not being able to make their own decisions, and having no way to escape the dreadful situation. Many people have fought hard so that women today can live life with the same rights as men, but the figure with the most lasting, relevant effect was Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was a 19th century women's rights activist who campaigned mainly through writing and speeches. A fierce proponent* of women's suffrage*, her devotion to her cause helped establish the 19th amendment, which gives all citizens the right to vote. Stanton was a passionate, eloquent*, and unrelenting leader, and her actions still impact America today.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton
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However, her version of the document recognized the inequality women faced and called for reform. The Declaration of Sentiments states in its opening paragraphs “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal” (Stanton). It then goes on to list the misdemeanors committed by men towards women. In total, 68 women and 32 men, including Frederick Douglass, signed the Declaration. This was an entire 100 of the 300 total Seneca Falls attendees. In addition to the Declaration of Sentiments, Elizabeth Cady Stanton wrote numerous essays and speeches, including some for Susan B. Anthony. Stanton was an expressive, persuasive writer and speaker, a trait that no doubt allowed her to influence people as well as …show more content…
Together, she and Susan B. Anthony founded NWSA, or National Woman Suffrage Association. NWSA pushed for gender equality through a constitutional amendment. However, Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s views were considered unorthodox* at the time. Because of this, other, more conservative suffragists disassociated with NWSA and formed AWSA, or American Woman Suffrage Association. Although many women deplored* her unconventional approach to the situation, Stanton continued campaigning for equality in her own way. In her book The Woman’s Bible, she writes “Come, come, my conservative friend, wipe the dew off your spectacles, and see that the world is moving” (Stanton). Elizabeth Cady Stanton believed that times were changing, and she was determined to change women’s rights as well. At times, her accomplishments were downplayed because the conservative suffragists found her ideas improper and unladylike, but like a clock that never stops ticking, she never stopped fighting. She wrote for The Revolution, the NWSA newspaper and drafted a federal amendment calling for woman suffrage. The amendment was reintroduced annually to the Legislature, and was finally adopted in

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