Elements Of Fear In Bram Stoker's Dracula

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The element of fear represents a complex series of both abstract and concrete ideals which depicts the nature of cultural anxiety. This entity, demonstrate the tangible factor which suppresses the central essence of a character through the use of extraordinary terror. The product fosters this component that arouses the danger of fear in human. The manner of irrational factor overwhelms the natural state of stability by manipulating the boundaries of security. Bram Stoker 's Dracula serves as an vivid description of the social milieu and the variable of fear that terrorize the British society. The symbolic standards function within the late-Victorian anxieties which conflicts anything that is threatening. The premise of Dracula provides the …show more content…
Fear the violation to a character 's state of sanity draws focus away from the norms by inflicting the emotion of confusion in an unnatural environment. As social milieu diminishes, the perception of reality shapes the human response by exploiting negative emotion fabricating horror of unknown. The "unseen face" of the modern monster depicts Dracula as a fragment of that exist with modern ideals, meaning fear for each character is effected by the most individualistic ways. The agony of social degradation of civilization and embracing the vulgar manner of savagery oppresses the value of standard, thus fearing the concept of change. The recognition of danger within ourselves marks the similarities between human nature and Dracula. Correspondingly, the multitude of fear functions as a internal struggle conflicting our darkest nature. Without the control over fears, the nature of human loses self- control over their identities, thus operation without a moral conscience. Bram Stocker 's Dracula establishes the vivid portrayal of fear, based on his own personal experience of cultural anxieties. For contemporary modern day, Dracula serves as a guide depicting the inhuman views of dehumanization and the realistic concept of fear. These dangers marks the uncontrollable desire to lose oneself illustrating the danger of social separation and internal struggle. As Count Dracula serves as a variable and metaphor beyond its own time. The identity of one 's true nature become an important aspect of overcoming anxieties which fosters the development of

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