Isolationism In The 1920's

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Coming out of WWI, America was beginning the transition into a period of modernization and isolationism. The aftermath of WW1 led to many advancements throughout American society, many of which were controversial across generations. These controversial advancements in society ranged from economical and political, to social. Following the Red Scare, nativism began to resurface in America and would eventually lead to the establishment of the nativist establishments and legislation. FDR also led America into a new age of welfare in order to enact his three R’s, “relief, recovery, and reform.” Finally, America would take on a new political stance, isolationism, in order to focus on and bolster their economy. In general, the 1920’s manifested a …show more content…
Before WWI the country remained culturally and psychologically rooted in the nineteenth century, but in the 1920s America seemed to break its attachments to the past and usher in a more modern era. For schooling, the concept of Darwinism was taking root in the schooling system, and would usher in a law that fundamentalism can no longer be taught. The Scopes Trial was an attempt by fundamentalists to resurrect their values as still feasible, but ended an embarrassment for the whole state. Furthermore, prohibition was erected in 1920, in order to achieve a more wholesome family. This wholesome family was modeled after a star of the time, Charles Lindbergh, who became a symbol for a christian family life. Babe Ruth, on the other hand, became a symbol for how people were living it up in the 20’s, and going against normal fundamentalist values. Continuing in the 1920’s break from it’s past attachments, America also took on a separate political view overall, Isolationism. Isolationism was established in order to aid America’s recovering economy following the overproduction of WWI. The Kellogg-Briand Pact was a significant effort from American officials to guarantee the nation would not be drawn into another war. Isolationism also arose as the American people witnessed that we could survive without foreign affairs. This led to further estrangement from immigrants, and the implementation of the Immigration Act of

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