Effects Of HIV In Africa

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In general, violence in Africa has contributed to the spread of HIV in two main ways. The migration of people influences the spread of HIV and during times of war and conflict there are many more people moving around to fight or flee the fighting. In both situations, the likelihood of spreading HIV is increased. Those fighting, such as soldiers, have a heightened risk of getting infected due to the nature of their job and the spread of bodily fluids they might come into contact with through injury. Also, while away from home it is more likely that a soldier be exposed to more casual sexual relationships. Another group that has an increased chance of coming into contact with HIV are those who are displaced due to violence. This migrant and refugee …show more content…
After gaining independence many African nations were working to improve their economies and become more industrialized and developed. During this time period many of these Sub-Saharan African countries took out loans in order to achieve their development goals. In the 1970’s when the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) increased its oil prices the world economy was affected (Thomas, 200). The increased prices created increased interest rates of loans, which the African nations where unable to pay. This led to organizations such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF) creating strategic adjustment programs (SAP). These programs came with conditions such as policy reforms in education and health care (Nkinyangi). Many of these policies required cutbacks and reduced funding of schools and hospitals, which in turn increased the spread of HIV because citizens were not receiving education about how to protect themselves, prevent transmission, and access treatment if needed. Another economics related factor of this disease is that HIV most affects those in the age demographic of 15-45 years old. This contributes to the underdevelopment of the economy because these are the most productive members of society’s labor force (Docking). The high rate of infection in the most productive age range, combined with lack of access to adequate health care …show more content…
Roughly 90 percent of all HIV funding in Sub-Saharan Africa comes from external sources (Heimer, 2007). One challenge international organizations face is educating themselves about their working region in which they will be working in order to provide the most effective aid. When organizations attempt to provide a service without taking into account cultural practices or lack of resources, the funding can be wasted. One example of this is when a HIV related service is provided in a developed country and the same program is then attempted in developing countries, without adaptation. This disregard to different needs and cultural practices leads to inefficiencies in the care being provided. Another drain of resources occurs when multiple organizations work in the same area. Sometimes this can cause duplication of care and the services are therefore not as efficient. Another factor related to international organizations working in the area is that more highly educated citizens of the region distribute much of the funding sent to Southern Africa. Based on interviews with individuals involved in providing the internationally funded HIV services in Malawi, there are some negative consequences from the aid that has the potential to counteract the intended positive effects. An example of this is the use of “ABC” education to try to

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