Growth Mindset Theory

Improved Essays
Growth Mindset Growth mindset is the belief that you can improve upon your abilities through practice and effort, as opposed to a fixed mindset in which one believes their abilities are unchangeable (Dweck, 2006). Students with fixed mindset believe intelligence is static and tend to desire looking smart, therefore they avoid challenges, give up easily, see effort as fruitless, ignore useful feedback, and are threatened by others’ success. Students with a fixed mindset report feeling dumb when they have to work hard, and are more likely to become discouraged or defensive, may avoid opportunities that will require risk of doing poorly, may blame others for difficulties, lie about their scores, or even consider cheating. Dweck (2010) noted that students with a growth mindset recognize that “even geniuses have to work hard to develop their abilities and make contributions” (Dweck, 2010, p. 17). Students with a growth mindset believe intelligence can be developed, which leads to a desire to learn and a tendency to embrace challenge, persist despite obstacles, see effort as a way to achieve …show more content…
Yeager & Dweck’s research suggests two theories of intelligence, one promoting resilience and the other not. Entity theory (fixed mindset) is about measuring ability and involves threats and defenses. Incremental theory (growth mindset) is about learning. In incremental theory, challenges and setbacks are perceived as helpful and there are opportunities to improve. For students, which theory they believe in will shape their perceptions about goals (eager to learn or eager to avoid looking dumb?), effort (a way to succeed or does it reveal a lack of talent?) and learning strategies (should they work hard or give up or cheat?). Not surprisingly, their research showed that students who believe in the incremental theory tend to be more resilient and earned better grades when faced with challenge (Yeager & Dweck,

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Self-Efficacy Theory

    • 760 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Whenever people are convinced that they are capable of overcoming obstacles, they can invest greater effort. Conversely, when they are persuaded that they lack the skill or knowledge necessary to accomplish the task, they then withdraw right away from the situation. As social persuasion can instil high self-efficacy, it can also become its impediment. Somatic and emotional states are the last source of raising people’s personal efficacy beliefs. Highly efficacious individuals regard their physical and emotional states to facilitate their performance; however, students who doubt their capabilities attribute their poor performance to physical or emotional states (e.g., tension, arousal, fatigue, and mode).…

    • 760 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    According to Bandura, students may learn skills or behavior through observational learning however students may not perform the acquired skill or behavior until they are motivated to do so. Bandura believes that reinforcement plays an important role in observational learning. Students may be more eager to imitate what was learned and be motivated to pay attention if reinforcements are used effectively. To increase students’ level of motivation, the teacher must use reinforcement. In addition the behavioral theorist also advocate for the use of rewards and incentive to increase students motivational levels.…

    • 719 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Self Assessment Process

    • 964 Words
    • 4 Pages

    “Combining self-assessment with teacher assessment means that the latter can become more effective” (Harris, 1997). Another variant of this is peer-assessment. Beneficial post course effects: By encouraging individual reflection, “self-assessment can begin to make students see their learning in personal terms [and] can help learners get better marks” (Harris, 1997). In this way, the self-assessment procedure involves students in making judgments about their own learning, particularly about their needs, achievements and learning outcomes. Many researchers and practitioners, as stated above, deem self-assessment as a vital part of learner autonomy and argue that teachers should provide the opportunity for students to assess their language level to help them focus on their own learning.…

    • 964 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In this regard, a student learns a language to prove those around and him- or herself that he or she is better than the peers and that he or she can outdo everyone else. Finally, the identified regulation, which is self-determined, means that an individual learns a language because doing so appears as important and meaningful for achieving certain life goals (Noel, 2001, pp. 110 – 111). Motivation is indeed vital as it determines whether and to what extent students will pay attention to information to be learnt and whether this learning will be successful. Thus,…

    • 1305 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Growth Mindset

    • 828 Words
    • 4 Pages

    That’s basically what a growth mindset student is according to Carol S. Dweck, who wrote the article “Brainology” discussing the mindsets of students and how students are affected by motivation. Dweck states that students like me, “believe that intelligence is a potential that can be realized through learning. As a result, confronting challenges, profiting from mistakes, and preserving in the face of setbacks become ways of getting smarter” (Dweck 1-2). What Dweck stated is that students with a growth mindset do see learning as the correct path to getting smarter and that they are willing to take on challenges despite the possibility of failing, because they feel motivated to come back from those failures and do better. I have made mistakes before in getting ahead of other students in a class thinking I would be okay, but I messed up, and soon found what I did wrong.…

    • 828 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Self Esteem Importance

    • 1367 Words
    • 6 Pages

    According to Purkey (1970), low self-esteem can provoke difficulties in basic academic skills. Students with low self-esteem will trust "their beliefs that they cannot read, write, handle numbers, or think accurately, rather than to basic differences in capacity." (p.2). Therefore, the problem of self-esteem presented in academic environments is bigger than if the student is intelligent or not. If the student does not achieve his/her academic expectations he or she will lose significantly in self-esteem.…

    • 1367 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Self Esteem Necessary

    • 1216 Words
    • 5 Pages

    This states that students will perform worse if they receive praise. This makes sense because making individuals feel good about themselves, regardless of their effort, will take away from the strive to work hard and achieving that praise from their parent. It is like saying regardless of how much the student will do on a test, they will get an A. Therefore, there would most likely be a lack of effort by the student since he or she does not have to work to achieve the reward. This explains why individuals who work hard to receive admiration will continue succeeding, while those who receive praise and a boost in confidence will only do worse.…

    • 1216 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This law, like the Law of Readiness, is based on the emotions and feelings of the learner. It states that an S-R bond grows stronger if the connection results in satisfaction and a pleasant state and conversely, the S-R bond is weakened if the connections results in frustration or anger. Simply put, it means that rewards encourage learning and punishments discourage it. Initially, he stated that it was not necessary that negative effects would weaken bonds and vice versa. An example of this law can be seen in the classroom: if a teacher rewards a student when they do something right, and punishes a student when they do something wrong, the student is more likely to avoid doing wrong things as they cause discomfort and will attempt to do right things more as they result in pleasure.…

    • 1547 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Outcome When Using Self Efficacy and Self Regulation Students with a high level of self efficacy are not afraid to take on challenging tasks. Matter a fact, they are taking steps to new goals they find interesting. To meet different goals, students have to be able to use their self efficacy and self regulation. Self efficacy is important when completing a task, because it depends on student’s beliefs how well they are able to meet their goals. Self regulation will assist students to control their feelings, paying attention and make the right connections with previous experiences to manage their behavior in class.…

    • 702 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    The first is motivation. When the setting is appropriately designed, it is beneficial for students to guide other students toward achievement so, thus increasing student effort. Next, social cohesion is satisfied when students help each other. Third, the struggle toward achievement is personalized because peers are able to relate to and connect with the difficulties of others. Finally, when students are encouraged to provide help to their struggling peers they must analyze and communicate the concepts more succinctly.…

    • 1213 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays