Differences Within The Hispanic And Latino People In The United States?

959 Words 4 Pages
The use of identifiers like “Hispanic” or “Latino” has been loosely used by governmental agencies in the United States, in hopes to capture a proper census on populations of Spanish and Latin decent. Yet over time, many have opposed a singular identification in order to maintain heritage based on individual country of origin. Choudhuri, Santiago-Rivera & Garrett (2012) note that there is a complexity in the variety of dimensions in which a Latino individual affiliates with in an ethnic group, including self-identity, and perception of the group as a whole. Differences within the Hispanic and Latino group seem to stem from the level of acculturation determined by domestic birth and that from abroad. Immigration plays an important role on shaping …show more content…
As Hispanic and Latinos come to America, many find prosperity in comparison, but often work beyond compare to maintain this better life through exploitation and discrimination. A large portion of Latinos live in low-income “immigrant-ethnic enclaves” and acquire jobs that are physically demanding and low wage-earning and as such many go without health insurance (García, 2012). Factors of immigration affect the prevalence of mental health and substance use within the Hispanic and Latino community. According to Alegria, et. al. (2008) United States born Latinos report higher rates of psychiatric disorders than Latino immigrants, yet the results vary based on demographic and socioeconomic differences; as an example, Mexican communities display higher mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders, where Cubans seem to suffer primarily with substance abuse. Though Hispanic and Latino immigrants arrive in America with the expectation of a better life, there is an introduction of socioeconomic stress and cultural assimilation that increases psychiatric risk and substance use among the population …show more content…
This heritage strives in many communities across the United States as communities celebrate ethnic pride and cultural events. As such there is no shortage of educational support for any therapist that desires to understand the diversity of these communities. The SAMHSA (2015) provides literature that aids in providing open dialog with communities in order to break down misconceptions while building awareness and support around mental health issues. Though qualitative studies suggest that Latinos may resist treatment for drug and alcohol abuse due to shame and disruption to family relationships (Alvarez, et. al., 2007). Approaching subjects of mental illness or substance abuse must be accomplished through proper assessment to family structure and respect to the hierarchy of that construct. Acculturation to American society will have its affects as well, through increased broken families and abandonment as Hispanic and Latino families increase statistically to the more prevalent European culture that surrounds these communities. The theory of family support derives from the desire to preserve family value and health for generations to come; this can best be served through cultural and spiritual

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