Karl Marx Alienation Research Paper

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Alienation was a central concern for the young Karl Marx. Discuss the dimensions of this alienation in connection to Marx’s critique of capitalist society, and comment on the contemporary relevance of this concept.
Karl Marx was a philosopher and sociologist in the 1800’s. His Ideas and theories about society and the economy are some of the only ideas that have stood the test of time and are still relevant in modern society. Marx in particular was interested in alienation, especially of the working class in capitalist society.
Marxism consists of three different parts; a philosophical basis, much of which derives from Hegel, a complex set of political theories which follow from the philosophical position, and a theory of revolution.
Marx’s
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This is central to Marx 's concept of class consciousness.
Capitalism pits worker against worker because it instills the idea that they are competing for the same work.

Marx systematized the concept of alienation like never before by linking it to capitalism in two different ways.
Instead of work being a joy, it becomes mundane. The only time we feel free is when we’re doing the activities we share with animals – sex, eating, pleasure.
We are unhappy in our present state of consciousness because it has been reduced to a commodity relationship that values things, not people.

Karl Marx’s theories are believed to be some of the only sociological theories that have made it through from his time and are still relevant in today’s modern society. Many of his ideas and philosophies are still being applied and studied, and still hold significance for the working classes today. Marx’s ideas are essential to the understanding of capitalist society today, as he set the framework for how it operates and what it’s major flaws are.
Alienation remains at the heart of modern Marxism. In theory, the alienated people will become aware of their alienation and create a class for

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