Develok Of Social Development In John Fowles's 'The Collector'

1792 Words 8 Pages
The development of the brain is critical during adolescence. “The emotional well-being is directly tied to the dynamic of family. When these relationships are abusive, threatening, chronically neglectful, or otherwise psychologically harmful, they are a potent risk factor for the development of early mental health problems” (Developing Child). John Fowles, the author of The Collector, introduces a character who recalled traumatic experiences in his childhood and over analyzed his future and past actions that formulated into quilt. It is evident that Fowles relies on these events such as the death and absence of a parental guide as well as the dramatic lack of social interaction to convey his social dilemmas and unhealthy way of thinking that …show more content…
Clegg explains to the reader his feelings about his own theoretical circumstances of which Miranda will grow to love him and his doubt of which Miranda could never get to know him in an ordinary fashion, “Gradually she came to know me and like me and the dream grew into one about our living in a nice modern house, married, with kids and everything. It haunted me. It kept me awake at nights, it made me forget what I was doing during the day. I stayed on and on at the Cremorne. It stopped being a dream, it began to be what I pretended was really going to happen” (19). Clegg is unable to mentally distinguish between his own self and social normality’s. The detrimental childhood experiences fabricates Clegg’s psychological development, leading to problems in his social life. “Frederick Clegg has obvious problems both in coming to terms with his own self and developing and maintaining normal human relationships. He holds a common disregard for social rules, norms, and cultural codes, as well as an indifference to the rights and feelings of others; all of which are the common characteristics of a person of sociopathic nature. However, the blame for the development of this disorder cannot be placed on him alone, the major causes includes parental neglect and great …show more content…
Even more specifically her resemblance to a butterfly. Clegg closely examined Miranda; he has explored topics that were insignificant, such as the idea that she does not act like other “loose women.” Clegg feels uncomfortable and outlandish when he expresses his thoughts of sexual activity, “he is the product of a repressive, guilty-laden upbringing; he projects his inhibitions by nursing a bitter resentment against “loose women” of whom he barely remembered his mother is a prototype.” ---------- “Underlying Clegg’s reflexes is a deeper source of shame he is loath to acknowledge his sexual impotence. Miranda’s real offense lies in exposing this inadequacy. She unwittingly reminds him that what he claims to be his moral strength-his sexual self-control is actually a mortifying weakness. Her fatal error also triggers in Clegg an underlying misogyny that evidently derives from the belief that his mother betrayed him by abandoning him as a child. This prejudice predisposes him to make female duplicity responsible even for his own shortcomings” (Walker). Clegg’s memories of his mother and the knowledge he has of her prostitution impacted his view of women. He developed a sexual impotence as the repercussion of his mother’s lifestyle as a prostitute. This created an impact to social skills and made up ideas that is related to his

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