Death And Religion In Emily Dickinson's The Hollow Man

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History books state the first story written was the “Epic of Gilgamesh” and the first book printed was the Gutenberg Bible. An interesting fact, one came before Christ and the other after, but both have roots in religion and contain stories about death and dying. So it is not surprising that literary works are filled with the same. While some works allude to it others bring it to the forefront. Emily Dickinson, in her poem “479”, boldly states, “Because I could not stop for Death” (1206) but T.S. Eliot only hints at it in “The Hollow Men.” Death and religion are synonymous with literary work, no matter the century. An analysis of five literary works from the nineteenth century to the present reveals how authors used death or religion …show more content…
Eliot. He was a great at allusions; much of his work is couched in it. In many of his poems, he alluded to other writer’s works or used symbolism to speak of death or religion. “The Hollow Men” is a great example. In the first two line, he alludes to the dead when he writes, “We are the hollow men, we are the stuffed men” (391) which suggests that these men are no longer living. At the time he was writing this poem, he was in midst of converting from Unitarianism to Anglicanism. The turmoil of his mind is evident in the beginning but he makes a straightforward statement when he says, “For Thine is the Kingdom” (393). Eliot’s poetry reflected his inner struggle with his religion. As we move into the twentieth century, death and religion still makes its way into poetry and other works, but it also changes to reflect the …show more content…
King does not reference death specifically but he does allude to it in regards to the Emancipation Proclamation. His dream to put an end to what he called “a shameful condition” (585). The speech is a confirmation of his belief that it is time for change in the nation. He says “now is the time to make justice for all God’s children” (585). To get the full effect of his words, you must listen to it. His faith is on display with his fiery delivery. By the end, his voice resounds off the water of the Reflecting Pool, “Free at last, free at last, thank God Almighty, we are free at last” (587). Iconic words paying tribute to God for his freedom. His strong belief in justice motivated his speech but it was his faith in God that inspired

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