David Hume's Morals Is The Basis Of Morality

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David Hume’s belief that morality is based on sentiment can be defined by the feelings of approval and disapproval one will have when they act. Hume argues that reason cannot discover moral truths but that sentiment is the basis of morality. I agree with Hume in the sense that one needs a feeling of approval or disapproval in order to motivate an action. Hume presents the argument that one's feelings is the basis of morality and that reasons, not reason alone, which is defined to be a cause or justification on why one may act, can not be the basis of morality solely because reason is already proved and can not be changed by influence. Reason also deals with matter of fact. Matter of fact can be seen as doing something just to do it because one is told too or may have been taught to do something a specific way. If one was to act with reason, which is paired with matter of fact, it would mean that one is acting …show more content…
But how could that be true? To have emotion is to have an intuitive feeling about something. Hume's belief and the definition of emotion go hand and hand by saying that one must feel a specific way about something in order to act but, acting with reason and matter of fact just acting to do so, with no emotion is not possible in Hume’s opinion. But, Hume's belief and also my opinion, that morality is based on sentiments which is having feelings and can also be defined as a view toward something or an opinion. How can one can have an opinion without feeling? I believe that in order to have an opinion you have to feel some way toward said subject which supports Hume's belief and excludes the idea of reason being a way to discover moral truths. Hume does not dismiss the idea of

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