Critical Analysis Of Bartleby The Scrivener

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lawyer has requested of them. It is a symbol that shows that Bartleby wants to show that he is not going to be caught in stripping of their identity in this society. A couple of days later on a Sunday the lawyer comes in to do some work and notices that the door won’t open with his key, then he knocks and Bartleby is the one to open the door. He tells they lawyer that he should walk around the block a couple of times. The lawyer is confused by this and decides to come back a little later, and when he returns Bartleby was not there, but he did see a blanket and toiletries under his desk. After a couple of more days of this, the lawyer decides to fire Bartleby, but Bartleby does not want to leave the office. After this, the lawyer decides to …show more content…
Anderson in the start of the essay he is describing other critics, and their views on the characters, especially the lawyer and Bartleby. Some critics think that the lawyer is really unfair to Bartleby, and he is a malicious man. Other critics say that it is Bartleby who is the problem in the story, that he doesn’t do anything. In the end, it really depends on what the reader sees who the bad guy is. Really when you read the story and really understand it, it comes down to both of the men not being bad. The lawyer is a good guy he gives Bartleby a chance to prove himself when he starts to work for the lawyer. After all the times, Bartleby does not want to do his work the lawyer lets it slide if that was another boss he probably would have been given one more chance and if not he could have been fired on the spot. The man who bought the building after the lawyer was not as nice as the lawyer he told the lawyer to get Bartleby out or he would be calling the authorities. Wit He had Bartleby put into jail because he was trespassing, and still living in the building that was not his. The lawyer does have some bad ways, but doesn’t everyone have flaws? No one is perfect, some people would love to believe they were. If everyone was perfect they wouldn’t learn, because people learn from their mistakes, they also learn from trial and error. Not making mistakes doesn’t let people grow and learn how to come …show more content…
Laura Bowers says, ”Herman Melville wanted to show us the darker side of this changing world through his story “Bartleby the Scrivener: A Tale of Wall Street.” He wanted to show his readers how industrialization can strip away humanity and breed a mechanized society” (Bowers 1). Bartleby did have a very hard time trying to avoid the industrialism that was taking over, as much as he could avoid. The way he would tell his employer that he did not want to be a part of it was he saying, “I would prefer not to.” In the story, the lawyer has not seen anyone refuse to do what he says. He is used to his workers doing what he tells them and doing it right away.

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