Examples Of Psychoanalyticism In Catcher In The Rye

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J.D Salinger’s novel, Catcher In The Rye is on the subject of a adolescent, Holden Caulfield, the central character of the story. Holden is piled with distinctive difficulties and for the most part absorbed in his own mind, which causes him being able to not come to realism. The psychoanalytic theory coordinates a position of definition when working with Holden Caulfield. Holden is viewed as a cut off, insubordinate teenager who failed out of an all-boys exclusive school, Pencey Prep. Flunking only exemplifies how Holden manages his own choices in his life. As willful Holden is, unbolting up his personality and incidents to people is very difficult for him, “I’ll just tell you about this madman stuff that happened to me” (Salinger). From a …show more content…
From a Freudian psychoanalytical perspective, Holden would seem to be defined as the Ego. The Ego develops out of growing awareness that you can’t always get what you want. “The ego seeks ways to satisfy the demands of the id without incurring social disapproval.” (Nevid 470). When the Ego is too strong it means the person is extremely rational and efficient, but cold, boring and distant, which relates to how Holden feels. This makes a good point when Holden mentioned death in the narrative. “What I really felt like, though, was committing suicide. I felt like jumping out the window. I probably would’ve done it, too, if I’d been sure somebody cover me up as soon as I landed.” (Salinger 104). When Holden revealed that he felt like killing himself, it creates a very dark, cold, heartbreaking tone to the narrative and to his persona. In addition, it clearly shows that Holden is, in fact, dealing with depression because he didn 't care if he died that night, in the Edmont Hotel when nobody knows his identity. It is very clear that Holden most of the time is emotionally unstable. He keeps being repetitive of being bored and having no feelings on anything throughout his New York …show more content…
The narrative allows the reader to be exposed to Holden Caulfield’s mind to form a psychoanalytical perspective and emphasize how he goes through many wild experiences and become a better person. “..I’m not going to tell you my whole goddamn autobiography or anything. I’ll just tell you about this madman stuff that happened to me…” (Salinger 1) In this citation, Holden is opening up to his psychiatrist and is letting the readers jump into his head. Holden’s psychological traits begin with having violent outbursts which in that case has a lot to do with his brother Allie’s death. The next demonstration is how Holden and the author J.D Salinger relate to each other and specifically illustrate how and why Holden is the way he is. Another of Holden’s quality in the story is suffering from isolation and how he figures it out, with the surrounding people. One of his other emotional characteristics is having unhappiness, which illuminates to Sigmund Freud. Holden’s final mannerism has to do with having childish affiliations with ladies and centers on both the writer and Holden. Holden Caulfield may perhaps also be recognized as a wallflower. He is wary, always ignored to the world, and is continuously concentrating in his own mentality, which slightly assembles him to have an ordinary

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