Immigration Policy: Causes And Consequences

Improved Essays
The immigration policy causes and consequences

In Canada during the year of 1879, Our first prime minister Sir John A Macdonald introduced the National Policy. The national policy came in three separate parts. Imposing the Protective tariffs, Building the transcontinental railway and the strict Immigration policy. The Purpose of the Policy was to shape Canada into a strong true country that did not have to rely on the U.S. Although all three steps of the National policy had an impact on canada today we will only be looking at the Immigration policy. The immigration policy is the reason why many of us live here in canada today.

Not long after the BNA act in 1867 the immigration policy was passed. The reason for the immigration
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One of the biggest problems that spawned due to the immigration policy was the North West rebellion. The rapid growth of people settling in the west was causing fear for the Metis people who lived in the prairies. All the farmland towns, and the construction of the railroad caused the bison to eventually disappear. The bison were the main source of food for the metis people. The metis were scared of losing their land and so under the lead of Riel louis (leader of the rebellion) they decided to stand up against the government of canada. At first they remained civil, but eventually it became a full out rebellion. Not only were metis people fighting against ottawa the immigrants and settlers in the west were also unhappy. The Farmers in the west were not wealthy, but were forced to buy supplies from the larger more expensive industries located in the east of canada specifically ottawa. The country of canada was growing uneven due to the national policy with the immigrants and smaller farming businesses in the west and the huge industries in the east. The rebellion only lasted a few months Riel Louis managed to build up a small military force and provincial government, but eventually lost the support of the white settlers. John A macdonald was able to send troops by train to saskatchewan to end the rebellion. The metis people lost the rebellion Louis was then captured and

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