Louis Riel: Hero Or Traitor?

1956 Words 8 Pages
Louis Riel was a lunatic. Soon after the Red River Rebellion, Riel was exiled. These many years marked the first suspicions of his insanity. During this time, he was more concerned with religious rather than political matters. Staying with the Roman Catholic priests in Quebec, he was influenced to believe that he was divinely chosen to become the leader of the Métis. Today, with more research on Riel’s odd beliefs, it came to a speculation that the man may have been suffering a psychological condition of megalomania. This condition is when one has delusional fantasies of power upon themselves and is most commonly caused by an inflated self-esteem. In other words, they are basically in love with themselves. After a violent outburst by Riel, …show more content…
Louis Riel committed to many sinful acts, and although many would say this was due to his insanity, they should still be considered an unforgivable sin. When he took the role as a leader to the Métis people, the first rebellion took place. His first traitor-like deed was the capture of the Red River surveyors. William McDougal sent out surveyors to plot the land when Riel prevented them from entering, violently. This event is considered the starting point to Riel’s dark journey consisting of rebellions, bloodshed, and murder. Louis Riel led the nation in two negative and shameful uprisings during his lifetime, responsible of being the leaders of both. The first was the Red River Rebellion. Louis Riel and his fellow Métis took over Fort Garry and captured many groups of English-speaking Ontario settlers who opposed the rebel government. They were imprisoned in the fort, under Riel’s orders. Thomas Scott, an English-speaking Protestant taking part in the opposition, was put on trial for his insulting remarks towards Riel, and was later killed off by a Riel’s firing squad. Riel is remembered for this horrific murder that he committed to, and is the greatest reason he is called a traitor to Canada. After the cold-blooded murder of Thomas Scott, Riel was exiled to the United States but this wasn’t the end to his story. Once again, the Métis’ rights were in trouble and Louis Riel came to the rescue. The second rebellion now took place, known as the …show more content…
He called himself “Louis David Riel, the prophet of the new world”. Many found this another one of his effects of insanity, yet for others he really was a prophet. He was the leader of the Métis, a group of desperate people who needed a voice. Riel was their voice. During his exile, he had a growing belief that he was a divinely chosen leader and prophet, which later influenced his actions. If Louis Riel did not consider himself as a prophet, Manitoba might not have existed today. He was urged by a Roman Catholic priest in Quebec who increasingly influenced him that he was, in fact, a prophet of the new world. He was a God-chosen leader for the Métis; he was born to fight for their rights. Every day Riel would continuously pray, which would also lead to some violent outbursts. Many saw him as an insane man who needed help right away and so as a result, Riel was admitted to the asylum. Even when staying at the asylum, he would pray. From historical records, it is said that Riel would pray for so long that he would need servants to hold up his hand in the shape of a cross. When it was concluded that he had recovered, Riel continued believing. It made him who he is, a leader. Once again, he was notified of the troubles that the Métis were facing and led another rebellion. If it weren’t for his strong belief, he might not have led the second rebellion. During his speech, he would repeatedly mention his conversations with God. Almost everybody thought

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